Best of the Mobile Net

Palm Blazer

Palm's Blazer browser lets you keep graphics and formatting, but it's better to view pages without them.

Palm's Blazer browser lets you keep graphics and formatting, but it's better to view pages without them.
Photograph: Rob Cardin
Palm's Blazer, which we tested on a Treo 755p (you'll find it on all Palm OS-based Treos), came in a distant third. This browser places emphasis on raw data and text rather than graphics, generally reformatting Web pages one column after another. It does have a Wide Page Mode that leaves some pages in their original layout.

The touch screen on Palm handsets makes navigating a Blazer-rendered page fairly speedy. To scroll a page, you can either use the horizonal and vertical scroll bars or enable the Tap and Drag command to move the page via the stylus. That works, but not as well as Safari's interface.

The large font and smallish screen on most Palms means you'll be scrolling a lot. The problem is compounded because Blazer reformats pages by stripping out most of their design, mangling layouts. In our Treo 755p rendering of the relatively simple pages of The Internet Movie Database, photos overlapped text.

Your best bet with Blazer: Switch it to Fast Mode, which strips all formatting and graphics from a Web page, giving you only straight text.

For comprehensive coverage of the Android ecosystem, visit Greenbot.com.

Subscribe to the Best of PCWorld Newsletter

Comments