The Most and Least Wired Airlines and Airports

The Best U.S. Airports for Techies

Which U.S. airports are best for business travelers and tech fans? To find out, we looked at airport amenities such as pervasive Wi-Fi coverage and the availability of power ports, recharging stations, Internet kiosks, and more.

1. Denver International Airport is one of the largest U.S. airports offering free Wi-Fi in most areas. To offset the costs, you'll see an ad--such as a 30-second video--when you log on. A caveat: The airport recently grabbed headlines for blocking some Web sites airport officials deemed racy. But as well, Denver's airport features business center kiosks that include computer terminals equipped with office productivity applications, laser printers, and power ports for recharging.

2. McCarran International Airport (Las Vegas): Like Denver, Las Vegas's airport provides free, ad-supported Wi-Fi throughout its terminals. The airport is adding power ports to seating areas and has converted phone booths into gadget-recharging zones.

3. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport has at least five Wi-Fi network services throughout the airport, though none are free. Delta, which operates a huge hub here, offers recharging/workstation centers at some departure gates. The airport also has Regus Express/Laptop Lane business centers at three terminals.

4. Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport and Orlando International Airport offer free Wi-Fi near gates and retail areas. Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport recently remodeled its busy Terminal 4, creating several new areas where computer users can place their laptops on a shelf and plug into an outlet. The Orlando airport also offers public Internet kiosks.

5. Philadelphia International Airport provides Wi-Fi service throughout its terminals that's free on weekends but requires a fee Mondays through Fridays. The airport also offers over 100 workstations throughout boarding gate areas with power outlets, as well as a Regus Express/Laptop Lane business center.

A few quick tips: Can't find a Wi-Fi network at the airport? Sit outside an airline membership lounge. Most offer Wi-Fi for their customers, usually for a fee. Also, be sure to pack a compact power strip in your laptop bag in case you need to share a wall socket at a departure gate. And if you're expecting a long layover, find out if a nearby airport hotel offers Wi-Fi in its lobby or restaurant, or in its guest rooms.

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