LoJack Service Can Treat Backup Tapes Like Stolen Cars

LoJack, the system many law enforcement agencies use to find stolen cars, can now find that file you misplaced.

Specifically, Fujifilm Recording Media introduced on Wednesday a service for tracking tape storage. It uses a transponder that fits in a standard tape cartridge and can be tracked just like a car that has the LoJack radio transmitter on board.

Though disk storage dominates data centers, many enterprises still use digital tape for backup because of its high capacity and stability. As time goes by, those tapes may be shipped from the facility where backup takes place to a disaster recovery facility or other site.

Fujifilm teamed up with SC-Integrity (SCI) to introduce the Fujifilm Tape Tracker, which can be placed in a standard cartridge so it looks like any other half-inch digital tape, and transported along with a set of tapes. Like a LoJack transmitter that is hidden on a car, the Tape Tracker emits a silent signal that many law enforcement agencies can track. With Fujifind, a Web-based interactive application, IT administrators can find the device using maps and satellite images provided by SCI, according to a Fujifilm press release.

The Tape Tracker is based on LoJack InTransit, a system SCI developed with LoJack starting in 2006 by combining the car-tracking technology with its own in-transit cargo service. Enterprises can set "geofencing" boundaries and get alerts when the tapes enter or leave an area, or be notified when there is a discrepancy in a shipping route.

The service, introduced at the AFCOM Data Center World Expo in Las Vegas, is available now through Fujifilm resellers in the U.S. for a list price of US$150 per month.

There is already a LoJack for Laptops, offered by Absolute Software, priced at $49.99 for one year or three years for $99.99.

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