capsule review

Averatec All-in-One D1130 Series Desktop PC

At a Glance
  • Averatec All in One

    PCWorld Rating

    This all-in-one's 18.4-inch display may lack touch, but its 1680 by 945 resolution is sharper than that of its MSI rival.

The distinguishing characteristic of Averatec's All-in-One D1130 Series is easy to see: a large, 18.4-inch display that's uncommon at this price ($529, as of 7/2/09). Uncommon, but not unheard of--not only does the MSI Wind Top AE1900 match the Averatec's screen size, but the MSI's display is single-touch capable to boot.

The Averatec and MSI have almost identical specs, providing the standard 1GB of RAM that's typically found on all-in-one PCs at this price, along with the good ol' 160GB hard drive. Intel's single-core 1.6GHz Atom N270 processor powers this system, versus the 1.6GHz Atom 230 (or optional Atom 330) in the MSI. We've seen all-in-ones like the $600 Shuttle X50 use the Atom 330; on PC World's suite of benchmarks, the chip doesn't produce any discernable performance improvements over similar systems with one-core versions of the processor.

The Averatec's score of 39 in our WorldBench 6 test suite is right in there with the performance of its similarly priced and configured peers. One of those (the Shuttle X50) lets you upgrade its RAM and hard disk, but most all-in-one PCs at this price, including this Averatec, can't be upgraded. Getting meaningfully better performance (and anything but the most basic graphics) simply requires spending more. The $944 Dell Studio One 19, for instance, achieved an impressive WorldBench 6 score of 93. Unsurprisingly, the Averatec's integrated Intel GMA950 graphics weren't able to complete any of our 3D gaming benchmarks, even at 1024 by 768 resolution.

Matching the system's large display is the equally impressive resolution of 1680 by 945--far greater than that of the AE1900's display. This makes text crisp and easy to read, although the display itself suffers from backlight emanating from the bottom of the screen. The colors appear more faded and plain here than on the richer all-in-one displays I've looked at.

While Averatec ups the ante by including a four-button mouse (with scroll wheel!), the flimsy keyboard is a letdown. Typing feels like pressing against a saltine cracker. The keyboard is annoyingly thin, and the keys are mashed together. Neither of the included input devices is wireless, a strange omission for an all-in-one. There are no connection options on the system's front--they're on the side instead. Two USB ports join a four-in-one card reader and a VGA output (you sure don't see that on AIOs nowadays, considering that an all-in-one is a big monitor). If that's not enough, the rear of the system is home to three additional USB ports. You'll appreciate them all, since making file transfers using an attached hard drive is much faster than doing so through the Averatec's anemic network connections. The ethernet port is a substandard 10/100-mbps connection, and the system supports only 802.11b/g connectivity. As you're waiting for your files to reach a different machine or a network-attached storage device, you'll wish that Averatec had heard of the words "gigabit" or "wireless-n."

The system's quick-start guide makes no mention of possible upgrades to the machine, and Averatec has no online support resources for its PCs.

Having a big screen with a good resolution is a great thing, but that's about all Averatec's D1130 Series has going for it. Otherwise, average connectivity matches average performance. It says a lot when a netbook looks like an appealing alternative to an all-in-one desktop.

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At a Glance
  • PCWorld Rating

    This all-in-one's 18.4-inch display may lack touch, but its 1680 by 945 resolution is sharper than that of its MSI rival.

    Pros

    • Big screen for the price
    • Comparable to peers in performance

    Cons

    • No 802.11n wireless
    • Superthin keyboard is difficult to use
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