Business Software

Google Public DNS, Cisco Gets Tandberg

Google is getting into the DNS resolution business with a new service out in an experimental version, while Microsoft also is experimenting with a maps service (take that Google). In other news this week, questions continue to be bandied about regarding Oracle's planned acquisition of Sun Microsystems, which is still stalled by European regulators.

1. Google Public DNS to speed up Web browsing and Google Public DNS: Wonderful freebie or big new menace?: Google Public DNS (Domain Name System), a DNS resolution service out in an experimental version, caught our attention this week, with the company claiming that it will speed Web browsing and make it more secure. David Coursey over at PCWorld looked at two different viewpoints regarding the service.

2. Cisco wins Tandberg with 91.1 percent stake: After more than two months of wrangling, Cisco Systems has managed to get control of Tandberg, taking a 91.1 percent stake in the videoconferencing company.

3. Microsoft's Bing tries to leapfrog Google Maps: The Great Microsoft-Google Rivalry took another twist with Microsoft using its Silverlight technology in Microsoft Maps, which is out in beta. The mapping service includes something called Streetside, which -- you guessed it -- rivals Google's Street View.

4. Study: MySQL use to drop under Oracle ownership, Oracle/Sun behemoth makes customer negotiations tricky and What if Oracle's buyout of Sun falls through?: If Oracle does manage to acquire Sun Microsystems, MySQL usage will drop, analyst firm The 451 Group found in a survey. And Gartner analyst George Weiss said at a company conference that if the deal goes through it will make it trickier for customers to negotiate deals. As if the concerns raised by those opinions are not enough, InfoWorld's Paul Krill took a look at a different question: What happens if the deal falls through?

5. SAP in for long haul with KPI project: SAP is going to have to keep trying to convince its users of the merits of its Enterprise Support service into the new year -- a situation sure to garner more entries on future lists of weekly top IT news.

6. Google News tweaks give publishers more control over content: Google is altering the way it allows access to news stories through its search engine so that publishers will have more control over what free content can be seen. The move was made to placate hostile news publishers who increasingly place part of the blame on Google for plunging revenue and drops in subscribers, since it is apparently easier to do that than to figure out how to make money in this "new" Internet era. Meanwhile ...

7. Comcast, NBC Universal venture eyes anytime/anywhere content: Comcast and NBC Universal formed a US$37 billion joint venture pairing Comcast's cable programming and online content with NBC Universal's assorted businesses, which also include online content, as well as cable and broadcast programming. This deal will be interesting to watch.

8. Harvard study: Computers don't save hospitals money: This week's hmmmmmm ... bit of news came from a Harvard Medical School study that looked at some of the "most wired" hospitals in the U.S. and found that computerization did not save them money or improve administrative efficiency.

9. Wall Street Beat: Cautious optimism reigns for tech: The cautiously positive economic news related to IT continued to trickle out. And we'll continue to take what we can get in those regards.

10. The carpal tunnel survival guide: Because we feel this pain, we offer Darren Gladstone's handy guide to dealing with carpal tunnel syndrome because we know that the advice he offers will actually bring relief.

Subscribe to the Daily Downloads Newsletter

Comments