Why Adobe Abandoned iPhone Flash App Plans

The white flag is being raised by Adobe in its latest battle with Apple, which could spell the end of the companies attempts to bring Flash to the iPhone overall. The company said that it will no longer pursue the ability to allow developers to create Flash apps intended for the iPhone/iPad, pointing to Apple's chokehold over development for the platform.

"As developers for the iPhone have learned, if you want to develop for the iPhone you have to be prepared for Apple to reject or restrict your development at anytime, and for seemingly any reason," Flash product manager Mike Chambers wrote on his blog Tuesday.

Chambers continued by all but saying Adobe's efforts had caught Apple in a lie, proving that Flash could work on the iPhone. He also said the company would now focus its efforts on competing operating systems like Android.

Working with Google could also get Apple's goat considering the two companies' relationship has soured considerably over the past year. Android is an open platform, and Google has not done much (if anything) to exert control over who is developing for it.

"We are at the beginning of a significant change in the industry, and I believe that ultimately open platforms will win out over the type of closed, locked down platform that Apple is trying to create," he wrote.

I'd now venture to guess that we've come to the end of the line when it comes to Flash on the iPhone period. It may not matter much now however, considering the dramatic uptick in use of HTML 5. That said, many major websites still do not support HTML 5 fully, so iPhone and iPad users will contine to have a broken experience when it comes to the Web.

Who does that benefit - Apple's own interests, or the interests of its growing customer base? Neither, I'd say.

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