Hot Gadget Preview for the 2010 Holiday Season

Kyocera Zio M6000

Flying somewhat under the radar given the plethora of muscle-bound Android cell phones recently announced is the mild-mannered Kyocera Zio M6000, a light CDMA2000 handset with a bright display that's aimed at the first-time smartphone user. The handset has a 3.5-inch display, a 3.2-megapixel camera, a trackball, and support for stereo Bluetooth devices. It's just under half an inch thick, and at 3.7 ounces it's lighter than larger and more sophisticated Android phones such as the Motorola Droid X (5.5 ounces). The phone offers 6 hours of talk time and up to 18 days of standby time. So far only Cricket, a no-contract, no-phone-subsidy carrier, has announced that it will sell the Zio M6000 (no pricing announced yet), but more carriers are in the works, says a Kyocera representative.

Oregon Scientific ATC9K All-Terrain Video Camera

Appropriate for people who don't mind getting black and blue in the great outdoors, the black and yellow ATC9K All-Terrain high-definition video camera from Oregon Scientific is a durable, shock-and-weather-resistant unit made to be strapped to a helmet, a surfboard, a bicycle handlebar, or another unsteady perch while you go about your activities. The G-Sensor captures measurements for speed, hang time, angle of movement, and other statistics, allowing users to fully retrace their movements. The $300 camera can capture 5-megapixel still images as well as 1080p HD video. Included is a remote control, along with a laser pointer to help align the camera with what you want to shoot. A $70 GPS module (available in August) permits you to capture and map your movements on Google Maps or Google Earth.

Omron Gosmart Pocket Pedometer HJ-203

If you're brave enough to walk away from your tech toys for some exercise now and then, you can still take a little tech with you in the form of Omron's lightweight Gosmart Pocket Pedometer. (The models featured here are the HJ-200 series.) Each $35 unit counts strides, measures distance, estimates calories burned, and can store up to seven days' worth of information. The Activity Tracker feature can monitor a specific exercise for a set time. The pedometer is available in purple, yellow, pink, and black.

Energizer Inductive Charger

The wave of the future may be wire-free inductive device charging. The Energizer Inductive Charger, available in October for $89, can wirelessly charge two devices at once and supports Qi, a new standard for wireless charging. The unit can charge an Apple iPhone 3G or 3GS and, with an additional sleeve or door accessory, a RIM BlackBerry Curve 8900 series handset. No magnets are involved--you can place devices anywhere on the flat panel. The device offers a USB port for wired charging, as well.

Phiaton Noise Cancelling Earphones PS 20 NC

City dwellers and commuters who are familiar with the concept of ambient noise may appreciate the Phiaton Noise Cancelling Earphones PS 20 NC for its effectiveness and its light weight. The in-ear headset uses the company's proprietary Noise Blocker technology to maximize the quality of the music coming from an MP3 player while minimizing interference from extraneous noises. The headset has multiple physical noise dampers in addition to the electronic noise cancelling technology. It uses a single AAA battery, has a frequency range of 15Hz to 22,000Hz, comes with an inline volume control and a choice of silicone earbuds, and weighs just 1.15 ounces.

For comprehensive coverage of the Android ecosystem, visit Greenbot.com.

Subscribe to the Power Tips Newsletter

Comments