Review: Glove.ly touchscreen gloves get the job done

At a Glance
  • Generic Company Place Holder Glove.ly Cozy

  • Generic Company Place Holder Glove.ly Classic

While some of us are already welcoming warmer temperatures, others are still spending time shoveling snow from their driveways (Minnesota, I’m looking at you). If you’re still dwelling in winter weather, you might want to look into a pair of touchscreen gloves to help you operate all your tactile tech devices while keeping your digits toasty.

To that end, Glove.ly has two pairs of touchscreen gloves that aim to solve the problem of answering a phone or checking a tablet with gloved hands. The company has two models of touchscreen gloves, the Classic and the Cozy, which both feature Glove.ly's MagLove technology. MagLove is what the company calls the tiny magnets that are sewn into the wrists of both gloves, enabling them to be gently attached to each other so you don't find yourself suddenly missing one glove. It's a nice detail, but not foolproof—while the magnets do hold the gloves together, they can be detached with a hard shake.

MagLove technology keeps your gloves together

In addition to the well-thought out magnetic attachments, the Glove.ly models are both made from a heavy-grade acrylic blend with the Cozy's featuring an additional lining for added warm. While that does make them a bit thicker, and therefore bulkier, than the Classics, I still had no problem operating the touchscreens on an iPhone 4S or an HTC Windows Phone 8X (or, for what it's worth, typing on my keyboard).

Both the Classic and the Cozy model use specially threaded silver fibers to provide conductivity to touchscreen devices, which means any part of the glove will work to operate a touchscreen. Fingertips, knuckles, and even the back of the hand portion of the glove all worked as easily as a non-gloved hand to open apps and scroll through contacts. Granted, texting with gloves on can be a bit of a challenge (landscape mode being easier than portrait mode) but neither model was particularly cumbersome to wear while sending text messages or entering information into a calendar.

While Glove.ly does caution that thick screen protectors may reduce the gloves ability to communicate with a touchscreen, I didn't encounter any issues with using them on my iPhone 4S which does have a fairly thick screen protector. Glove.ly also calls the gloves "one size fits all," which I would amend to "one size fits most"—while I had zero issues with fit, they were less comfortable for Jason Cross' larger hands where they came up short in the wrist and in the sections in between fingers. They also lack any gripping material in the palms to help you hold onto your phone.

Overall, however, the Glove.ly gloves were quite comfortable to wear, worked as they should, and managed to keep my hands toasty. At $30 for the Cozy's and $25 for the Classics, they're priced comparably to other touchscreen gloves and while they're not available in multiple colors or styles, they lack any bothersome seams in the fingers and have touchscreen functionality throughout the glove. The MagLove technology is a nice added bonus, as well.

This story, "Review: Glove.ly touchscreen gloves get the job done" was originally published by TechHive.

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At a Glance
  • Generic Company Place Holder Glove.ly Cozy

  • Generic Company Place Holder Glove.ly Classic

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