mobile browsers

Revamped mobile browser engines rev up rivalries

Big changes are coming to the fiddly and sometimes annoying Web browsing experience on cellphones.

opera logo

In apparently uncoordinated announcements last week, Google introduced a new open-source engine that will also be adopted by Opera; and the Mozilla Foundation, the organization behind the Firefox Web browser, said it is working with Samsung on a new Web browser engine for cellphones.

The browser engine lies at the core of a Web browser. It interprets the HTML code and decides how content is displayed on the screen. It's because different desktop browsers use different engines that pages sometimes load faster or look better in one browser than in another, so the choice of engine directly affects the user experience.

Mozilla teams with Samsung

Mozilla disclosed it has been working with Samsung on a new engine called Servo.

mozilla

"Servo is an attempt to rebuild the Web browser from the ground up on modern hardware, rethinking old assumptions along the way," wrote Brendan Eich, Mozilla's CTO, on the organization's blog.

"This means addressing the causes of security vulnerabilities while designing a platform that can fully utilize the performance of tomorrow's massively parallel hardware to enable new and richer experiences on the Web," he wrote.

The engine will be written in a programming language called Rust, which Mozilla said it developed with a community of developers.

The first implementation of Servo will be for smartphones based on Google's Android operating system running processors from ARM. That describes the vast majority of non-Apple cellphones in the market today and could mean trouble for Google, which is pushing its Chromium browser at smartphone users.

Google shifts gears

However, Google is launching Blink, a variant of the open-source WebKit engine. WebKit forms the basis for the current Chromium browser and Apple's Safari browser, but Google said it was getting harder to use for Chromium as Chromium has grown in complexity.

chromium logo

"This was not an easy decision," wrote Adam Barth, a Google software engineer, on the company's Chromium blog. "We know that the introduction of a new rendering engine can have significant implications for the web. Nevertheless, we believe that having multiple rendering engines—similar to having multiple browsers—will spur innovation and over time improve the health of the entire open web ecosystem."

Blink, which is open source, will also form the base of the Opera Web browser, according to a posting by an Opera employee on his personal blog.

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