Verizon: Don't blame us for Nexus 7 holdup

As the Nexus 7’s lack of Verizon Wireless support drags on, Verizon passes the blame to Google and Asus.

In a statement to Android Police , Verizon says that a “systems issue” came up during the certification process for the Nexus 7 (shown above), Google’s 7-inch tablet. Resolving the issue would have required further work on the Android Jelly Bean operating system to resolve.

“Since Google was about to launch its new Kit Kat OS, rather than undertake this work, Google and Asus asked Verizon to suspend its certification process until Google’s new OS was available on the Nexus 7,” Verizon’s statement said.

Nexus 7
Nexus 7

The problems with certification came to light in September, when tech pundit Jeff Jarvis tried to activate his Nexus 7 on Verizon, and was told that the tablet “can not be activated.” Jarvis argues that Verizon must activate the device under Verizon’s open-network requirements, though the carrier still requires a certification process for all devices. At the time, Verizon simply said that the device was not yet 4G LTE certified.

No timetable set

Verizon isn’t going into details on the “systems issue,” and there’s no clear timetable for when the Nexus 7 will get the necessary approval. All we know is that Android 4.4 Kit Kat is coming “soon” to the Nexus 7 according to Google, and the certification process could resume after that.

For now, Google continues to not advertise Verizon support for the 4G LTE version of its tablet, which sells for $349 with 32GB of storage. Google had touted 4G LTE support for AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon—all on the same hardware—when it announced the Nexus 7 in August.

Meanwhile, Verizon just launched its own budget 4G LTE tablet, the Ellipsis 7 , priced at $250, or $150 with a two-year contract. The timing is certainly unfortunate, but unless Google or Asus say otherwise, there’s no proof that this is anything but a coincidence.

This story, "Verizon: Don't blame us for Nexus 7 holdup" was originally published by TechHive.

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