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WebSnap

At a Glance
  • Generic Company Place Holder WebSnap (Donate)

    PCWorld Rating

Create .jpeg files of Websites you visit. It seems like a straightforward enough idea, and you can understand the utility of capturing what a Website looked like at a particular point in time. WebSnap is an app that does just that. However, too much is currently lacking in WebSnap for it to act as a go-to app.

Taking a picture of a Website is mercifully easy, and simply a matter of inputting the URL. But looking at the image is a bit more of a hassle, especially with the free version. WebSnap will show only the top portion of the image of the Website. To see what it actually looks like, you must connect your phone to your computer with a USB cable and export the images. Also, WebSnap doesn't work with all Websites. Which sites it works with and which it doesn't is a bit of a mystery, and finding out whether image capture worked or not requires you to connect your phone with your computer. Although you will see a preview image regardless, whether or not WebSnap actually took a picture is uncertain at that stage.

WebSnap has the option to set up file-naming conventions. The instructions for this on the help page weren't totally clear to me, but luckily renaming files when you transfer images to your computer is easy enough that this didn't seem terribly important.

This paid ($1) version of WebSnap allows you to e-mail images to yourself, a far more convenient way to transfer files than connecting your phone to your computer.

Unfortunately, WebSnap is also prone to frequent crashes, so there is no strong reason to recommend it at this time.

See other recent articles by Paul Jickling.

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At a Glance
  • Generic Company Place Holder WebSnap (Donate)

    PCWorld Rating
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