Top 8 Facebook Memes

5. I Know Where You Like It

Image courtesy of Flicker user Jilted Ballerina
Tiffany likes it on the kitchen table. Jen's even dirtier: She likes it on the bathroom floor.

I'm not sure what you're thinking, but I'm talking about where those ladies like to keep their purses. That was the subject of an intentionally suggestive fad that flew through Facebook this year.

Hey, don't look at me like that--I didn't come up with the idea. Believe it or not, it was another meme made in the name of breast cancer awareness (allegedly, at least; I'm not entirely convinced it made anyone think about mammograms).

6. The Doppelganger Gang

My old college roommate looks totally like Uncle Jesse from Full House. All right, I'm lying: He looks more like Kimmy Gibler. But that would be far less flattering to say.

These are the kind of thoughts that most of us forced ourselves to suppress during Facebook's "Doppelganger Week" in February. No one is quite sure how it got started, but hordes of users started changing their profile pictures to photos of celebrities they thought they resembled (and by "thought they resembled," I mean "actually looked nothing like").

Amazingly, I didn't see any takers for Carrot Top.

7. The Urban Dictionary Distraction

Do you know what your name means? Not what your parents thought it meant, mind you, but what some random dude on the Internet decided it represents.

During Facebook's Urban Dictionary Week, it was tough to avoid this kind of knowledge. The week saw scores of users looking up their names on UrbanDictionary.com, a user-generated and often silly slang dictionary, and then posting the definitions on their Facebook pages.

The name "Mark," interestingly, is defined in Urban Dictionary as "the most sexy, erotic, flirtatious, hot stuff, bootylicious four-letter word you'll ever see." Nice try, Mr. Zuckerberg...nice try.

8. Boobquake 2010

Ladies and gentlemen, we've arrived at our final memorable Facebook meme, and suffice it to say, we've saved the breast--err, sorry, best--for last.

Back in April, thousands of women posted photos of their cleavage to Facebook as part of a demonstration called Boobquake. A college student from Indiana started the sexy-sounding effort after an Iranian cleric claimed that provocatively dressed women cause earthquakes. (Yes, you read that correctly.)

"We should be able to test this claim scientifically," the student wrote on her blog. "On Monday, April 26th, I will wear the most cleavage-showing shirt I own.... I encourage other female skeptics to join me and embrace the supposed supernatural power of their breasts."

The results? The Boobquake caused no significant increase in seismic activity, according to its organizer. It did, however, cause a significant decrease in male productivity.

A complete coincidence, I'm sure.

JR Raphael is a PCWorld contributing editor and the cofounder of geek-humor site eSarcasm. You can find him on both Facebook and Twitter.

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