Office Staff Scared of Videoconferencing, Survey Says

More than a third (39 percent) of office staff won't use video communications at work because they're concerned about their appearance on camera, says Damovo.

Research by the IT services firm revealed one in ten are too embarrassed to talk in front of a camera because it feels like public speaking, while of those happy to use video communications, 19 percent say their working location (either at home or on the road) isn't suitable for video.

However, nearly two thirds (63 percent) of office workers believe they are more likely to take action following a conversation in a videoconference than after receiving an email containing the same instructions or information.

"There is still a perception that any video, be it multi-party conferencing or one to one, at work has to take place in a special room with technical equipment," said Alex Donnelly, portfolio manager at Damovo UK.

"However, video conferencing is now possible from a worker's desk or home as long as they have a camera with a built-in microphone and a broadband connection. Video is no longer as expensive as it once was, and should ideally be used as an extension to their existing communications suite."

Donnelly added that more organisations need to encourage their workers to use video conferencing and treat it in the same way as "picking up the phone or walking over to someone's desk for a chat".

However, 88 percent admitted they've used video services such as Skype to talk with friends at home.

The research also revealed 69 percent said online communication mean they miss out on the advantages of face-to-face interaction, such as being able to understand people's facial expressions.

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