VMware promises Heartbleed patches for affected products by the weekend

PCWorld News

VMware started patching its products against the critical Heartbleed flaw that puts encrypted communications at risk, and plans to have updates ready for all affected products by Saturday.

The company’s first Heartbleed patches were released Monday and are available for Horizon Workspace Server, its application management and virtualization software. The OpenSSL library used in the product has been updated to version 1.0.1g, which resolves the Heartbleed issue, the company said in a security advisory.

Users of Horizon Workspace Server 1.0 are advised to upgrade to version 1.5 and then apply the horizon-nginx-rpm- patch. Users of Horizon Workspace Server 1.5 should also install the aforementioned patch, while users of Horizon Workspace Server 1.8 should update to horizon-nginx-rpm-

Other software from the Horizon product line, like the Horizon Workspace Client for Windows and Mac OSX and the Horizon View Client for Windows, Android and iOS, is also affected, but has yet to be patched.

VMware also identified many non-Horizon products that use OpenSSL 1.0.1 and are therefore vulnerable to Heartbleed. These include: ESXi 5.5, NSX-MH 4.x, NSX-V 6.0.x, NVP 3.x, vCenter Server 5.5, VMware Fusion 6.0.x VMware OVF Tool 3.5.0, VMware vCloud Automation Center (vCAC) 6.x, VMware vCloud Networking and Security (vCNS) 5.1.3 and VMware vCloud Networking and Security (vCNS) 5.5.1.

Patches for vFabric Web Server 5.0.x—5.3.x have been provided separately by GoPivotal, a joint venture between VMware and EMC that now controls the product.

VMware has published a knowledge base article that lists the affected products identified so far and said that it expects to have patches ready for them by Saturday. The related security advisory will continue be updated as those patches are released.

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