Oracle Continues to Make Sun Customers Miserable

I've been putting off writing about my ongoing saga with Sun Oracle, because I have yet to reach anything resembling satisfaction. But I can't stop myself from venting anymore. You simply would not believe how frustrating it is to get any kind of Sun hardware or software support from Oracle.

In fact, to put it succintly: You can't. At least, I certainly haven't been able to.

[ Paul Venezia's problems with Oracle support have dragged on since last March. | Feeling nostalgic? See InfoWorld's classic homage to Sun in this memorial slideshow. | Want to cash in on your IT experiences? InfoWorld is looking for stories of an amazing or amusing IT adventure, lesson learned, or war tale from the trenches. Send your story to offtherecord@infoworld.com. If we publish it, we'll keep you anonymous and send you a $50 American Express gift cheque. ]

For the past several months I've been having problems with two Sun Unified Storage Servers. Most of these were related to bugs introduced into the newer versions of the appliance software -- problems like tens of thousands of spurious CIFS IOps due to a bug that caused a single workstation to generate thousands of IOps simply by having an Explorer window open to a share on the storage array. That bug was introduced in the same software update that fixed significant problems with the snapshot deletion methods and made replication work again since that was broken in a previous release. Oh, and that same firmware update also caused the array to spontaneously reboot every once in awhile.

But that's OK for primary storage, right? I mean, who needs storage that's available 24/7/365? Only anyone who runs a business....

Tickets were opened, phone calls were made, emails went unanswered, tickets were never closed. The problems were addressed at first with a binary patch that was apparently custom-made to address this problem (which sends up all kinds of red flags), but that re-introduced other problems. It became apparent that the support team has no idea what's happening. That really gave me a warm, fuzzy feeling.

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