10 Hard Truths IT Must Learn to Accept

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In a perfect world, your network would suffer no downtime and be locked down tight. You'd be in perfect compliance with all government regulations, and your users would all be self-supporting. The cloud would take care of nearly all your infrastructure needs, and there wouldn't be a single device accessing the network you didn't first approve of and control.

Also: You'd finally get the respect and admiration you truly deserve.

[ Bring peace to your IT department by avoiding IT turf wars. | Find out which of our eight classic IT personality types best suit your temperament by taking the InfoWorld IT personality type quiz. ]

Good luck with all that. The gap between your dreams and cold hard reality just gets wider every day. That doesn't mean you should give up, but it does mean you need to get real about what you can change and what you must accept.

Here are 10 things IT must learn to live with.

IT concession No. 1: The iPhone revolution is here to stay

More and more workplaces these days resemble a geeky party that's strictly BYOD (bring your own device). The problem? Many IT departments either never got an invitation or failed to RSVP.

May 2011 surveys by IDC and Unisys found that 95 percent of information workers used self-purchased technology at work -- or roughly twice as many as executives in those surveys estimated. IDC predicts use of employee-owned smartphones in the workplace will double by 2014.

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Nathan Clevenger, chief software architect at mobile device management firm ITR Mobility and author of "iPad in the Enterprise" (Wiley, 2011), says the iPhone and iPad are the catalysts for the consumerization of IT. Tech departments can either enable them to be used securely or risk the consequences.

"Unless IT supports the devices and technologies users demand, the users will simply go around IT and use personal tech for business purposes," Clevenger says. "That is a much more dangerous situation from a security standpoint than supporting the consumer devices in the first place."

Tech departments need to steer a middle course between attempting (and failing) to keep consumer technology out of the workplace, and allowing unfettered access to the network from any device, notes Raffi Tchakmakjian, vice president of product management at Trellia, a cloud-based mobile device management provider.

"BYOD is a scenario IT departments are learning to live with, but they struggle to manage them from a security, cost, and operations perspective," he says. "It becomes very difficult to ensure compliance to corporate standards and still meet business needs. They need a management solution that ensures corporate data security and allows them to manage costs with minimal impact on IT operations and infrastructure." (InfoWorld's "Mobile Management Deep Dive" PDF report shows how to do so.)

IT concession No. 2: You've lost control over how your company uses technology

It's not just consumer devices invading the workplace. Today a business user with absolutely no tech acumen can spin up a third-party business cloud service with a phone call and a credit card or, in many cases, a Web form and a click of a button. IT has lost control over IT.

That's not necessarily a bad thing. The burgeoning universe of cloud and mobile apps can give frustrated business users access to tech resources they need without putting an additional burden on IT staff or budgets.

"For years, IT has controlled every device, application, and process around technology," says Jeff Stepp, managing director of Copperport Consulting. "But with business units getting more technically savvy and frustrated with IT, they have gained executive support to go off on their own to research, procure, and implement new apps and gadgets. These newly empowered business units are often successful in getting what they need implemented more quickly and cheaply than going through their own IT department."

Your job is no longer to provide top-down solutions; it's to enable business users to make the right decisions, says Scott Goldman, CEO of TextPower, maker of text-messaging platforms for business.

"Instead of struggling to regain control, tech departments should strive for something more valuable: influence," he says. "When IT departments treat their users as customers instead of complainers, they get more of the results they want. The days of the all-powerful IT department dictating methods and machines is gone. The sooner they realize it, the faster they'll actually regain some level of control."

IT concession No. 3: You'll always have downtime

Eventually, even the best-maintained data centers will go down. Think you have redundancy up the wazoo? You're one of the lucky few.

In a September 2010 survey (PDF) of more than 450 data center managers, sponsored by Emerson Network Power and conducted by the Ponemon Institute, 95 percent reported suffering at least one unplanned shutdown during the previous 24 months. The average length of downtime: 107 minutes.

In a perfect world, all data centers would be built around highly redundant, dual-bus architectures where maximum load on either side never exceeds 50 percent, says Peter Panfil, a vice president for Liebert AC Power, a division of Emerson Network Power. They'd be able to handle peak loads even when critical systems fail and others are down for maintenance, with a separate recovery facility ready to come online in case of a region-wide disaster.

In the real world, however, 100 percent uptime is only possible if you're willing to pay for it, and most companies aren't, says Panfil. That forces data center managers into a game of "IT chicken," hoping outages don't occur when systems are beyond 50 percent capacity.

Organizations where uptime is essential to survival are segmenting their data centers, he adds, reserving high availability for their most critical systems and settling for less elsewhere. If their email goes down for half an hour, it's annoying but not fatal. If their real-time transactions system goes down, they're losing thousands of dollars a minute.

"It is always better to have the capacity and not need it than to need it and not have it," he says. "But the people who are signing the checks don't always make that choice."

For comprehensive coverage of the Android ecosystem, visit Greenbot.com.

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