flickrlogins

Flickr to dump Facebook, Google logins in favor of Yahoo accounts by end of June

Flickr is one of Yahoo’s most popular services and since former Googler Marissa Mayer became CEO, Yahoo has been looking to capitalize on the photo-sharing site’s popularity. Last year, Yahoo tried to attract more users by offering 1 terabyte of free online photo storage. Now the company is using Flickr as a gateway for creating a Yahoo account—if you didn’t have one already, that is.

“Starting this month, we will be requesting that everyone use a Yahoo username and password to sign in to Flickr,” Markus Spiering, Flickr’s head of product, said on the service’s forum Friday.

The forum posting also says that “eventually Facebook and Google sign-in will be removed.” When exactly, Yahoo will dump Facebook and Google logins for Flickr is unclear. However, The Next Web reports the deadline is June 30. Yahoo was unavailable for comment as this article was posted.

March madness

Flickr’s changeover to Yahoo IDs only has actually been in the works since March. At the time, Yahoo dumped Facebook and Google logins from the company’s College Basketball Sports Tourney Pick’Em service leading up to March Madness. Yahoo also said it planned to convert all its web properties into Yahoo-only logins over time.

Flickr has set-up a special login page for Facebook and Google users that asks you to sign-in one last time with your third-party options. After that, you’ll be prompted to create a new Yahoo account. The special login page will also let anyone who already has a Yahoo ID, but hasn’t been using it with Flickr, to connect their Flickr account to their Yahoo login.

Yahoo says it is making the change to better serve its users with features such as easier password recovery, faster customer support, and a unified company login.

That last point is particularly important since Yahoo’s biggest play here is to try and own its users again. Like other web giants, Yahoo wants to be your online data silo and to get a sense of your preferences by tracking your Yahoo ID across the web. That’s a strategy that has proven very valuable for Google since data such as email contents, location data, and browsing history help the company more precisely target ads, and thus attract more advertisers.

A heavily used Yahoo ID also enables the company to offer a more unified and personalized set of services.

Yahoo originally introduced Facebook and Google login options in 2011.

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