Wi-Fi Users Clueless About Security

New research conducted on behalf of the Wi-Fi Alliance shows that while wireless users are making strides on the security front, they're still leaving their Wi-Fi networks too open to intruders.

BETTER WIRELESS: Software upgrades could produce self-tuning wireless access points

The survey, conducted by Wakefield Research on behalf of the Wi-Fi Alliance, found that 86 percent of Wi-Fi users have taken basic privacy and security steps in setting up their access points and routers. However, while 97 percent of those surveyed said they believe the data on their devices and networks is "safe and secure," these same people scored an average of 66 percent when asked about a series of recommended security/privacy steps that they've taken. Some 59 percent have failed to use passwords meeting basic security criteria, only 62 percent have auto-sharing turned off and just 18 percent use VPNs when on a wireless hotspot.

The Wi-Fi Alliance recommends enabling WPA2, creating strong Wi-Fi network passwords (at least 8 characters long, with a mix of letters and symbols) and changing them regularly, and turning off automatic sharing on devices to avoid connecting to suspect networks.

The survey was conducted during August and involved 1000 interviews with a mix of people across the United States.

Dangerous Driving

The Wi-Fi study results are somewhat remindful of those in another recent survey, but this focused on cellphone and texting use while driving, and conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

Some 95% of those surveyed said they view other drivers emailing or texting while driving to be a danger to their own health, but 35% of those same drivers acknowledged having sent or read a text or email message in the past month. According to the survey, 88% of drivers feel talking on a phone is a threat to safety, yet two-thirds admitted to having talked on a cellphone while driving in the past 30 days.

The Web-based survey was conducted in June and involved some 3100 U.S. residents.

There's nothing unsafe about following Bob on Google+ (just don't do it while driving or on an unsecured Wi-Fi network)

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