Angry Birds 'Most Copied Brand in China,' Developer Fine With This

We've already seen today that Angry Birds plagiarism is rife -- but what does developer Rovio think about all this?

Apparently, the company isn't too worried. TechCrunch reports that Rovio CEO Peter Vesterbacka wandered out on stage at the Disrupt conference in Beijing holding a clump of illegal Angry Birds balloons he had purchased on the streets. Rather than seeking to attack these producers of illegal knockoffs, Vesterbacka uses the unlicensed products and designs as inspiration for official products and the Angry Birds brand's whole retail strategy.

"Right now, we've proven that there's demand, and we're going for 100 million downloads this year for Angry Birds [in China], and again the same demand for the physical products," he said. "Of course we want to sell the officially licensed, good quality products, but at the same time we have to be happy about the fact that the brand is so loved that it is the most copied brand in China."

Vesterbacka believes that a large proportion of Rovio's future business endeavors will launch in China first, rather than the company's native Finland. Retail stores, services, toys, animated shorts, feature films and even cookbooks are reportedly in the pipeline. "We want to be more Chinese than the Chinese companies," explained the Rovio CEO.

Rovio believes that Angry Birds is "the fastest growing brand ever," outstripping established services like Google, Facebook, YouTube, Skype and others. Vesterbacka, when considering the inevitable Angry Birds movie -- reportedly "two or three years" away -- questioned whether or not the animated feature would even hit movie theaters.

"We have pretty massive distribution power through our game," he said. "We probably have more distribution power than any of the Hollywood studios."

Expect the Angry Birds movie as DLC for the game, then?

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