Thailand Prime Minister's Twitter Hacked

People know you through your Twitter account. That's how you express your opinions, your thoughts, and your concerns. And if you have a business, you promote it through your tweets.

So the last thing you want is someone else tweeting their opinions, thoughts, and concerns while masquerading as you. Should someone successfully hack your Twitter account, you're going to be embarrassed at best and ruined at worst.

And if someone can successfully hack a prime minister's Twitter account, no one is safe. And last month, the Prime Minister of Thailand's Twitter account was hacked, presumably by someone who voted for the opposition.

On Sunday, October 2nd, someone hacked the Twitter account of newly-elected Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra. The hacker posted eight tweeks over a period of about twenty minutes, ending with a taunt that "If [Shinawatra] can't even protect her own Twitter account, how can she protect the country?"

If you don't want a stranger to embarrass you in front of the entire country (or just your friends), take precautions. Set up your Twitter account with a strong password, one that's at least 12 characters long and contains numbers as well as upper- and lowercase letters. Be careful where you type in that password; don't enter it on any site other than Twitter itself. And make sure you don't have malware on your computer or phone that's watching what you're doing and recording your keystrokes.

Any one of Trend Micro's Titanium products will protect you from such malware. These programs can also protect you from malicious web sites, lowering the chance that you'll be tricked into giving up your password. But Titanium Maximum Security goes well beyond those jobs. It can block malicious links in emails, provide special security for Twitter and other social networks, and protect your smartphone as well as your Windows PC.

By the way, a suspect was arrested within a week of the Prime Minister Shinawatra's hacking. But don't expect the police to be so dedicated when it's your account that gets hacked.

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