Security

EU Commissioner Kroes Wants to Invest in Security Technologies

Neelie Kroes, the European Union's digital agenda commissioner, wants to use funds from the E.U. budget to invest in security technologies, and also called for more transparency in the security product market during a prerecorded speech at the Infosecurity Europe conference in London on Tuesday.

The E.U. is preparing to step up its battle against hackers, but to improve security measures Europe needs a more vibrant internal market, according to Kroes.

"I want to invest in innovation for security technologies, including through the E.U. budget," said Kroes, without going into detail.

To keep hackers at bay there is also a need to make it easier for normal users to protect themselves.

There would be more demand for better security products if end users were better aware of what's on offer, she said.

The main pillar of Kroes' security push is the upcoming European Strategy for Internet Security, which was announced last month and will be presented sometime during the third quarter.

Member states will need to guarantee minimum capabilities. They will also have to establish competent authorities, centralizing information that can be shared, according to Kroes.

The obligation to notify of security breaches that already exists for the telecom sector should also encompass other sectors relying on critical information infrastructure, including energy, water, finance and transport, she reiterated.

There is also a need for more global cooperation, according to Kroes.

Internet security isn't a problem that's just going to go away, according to Kroes. During her six minute speech around 700 new pieces of malware could have been developed across the globe," she said.

However, by building response networks, a decent governance structure, the right incentives to the private sector, a vibrant internal market, and cooperate internationally Internet security can be improved, she said.

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