capsule review

MultiMi Brings Your Entire Online Presence Under One AVG-Secured Client

At a Glance
  • Generic Company Place Holder MultiMi

    PCWorld Rating

    MultiMi is an original take on social clients, but it's not necessarily better than the defaults.

Note: This software has been discontinued. The file has been removed at the vendor's request.

How do you control your ever-increasing number of social networks and activities? Most either keep their networks separated, or use social clients such as HootSuite or TweetDeck to aggregate their social activities under one roof. These are great options for controlling your social accounts, and sometimes even your blog, but what about email, calendar, media and documents? A new free solution from AVG aims to bring all these activities under one client called MultiMi.

MultiMi interface screenshot
The customizable MultMi homescreen. You can decide what aspects of your social life will be included in your homescreen.
Many things about MultiMi sound innovative and exciting. To start, it aggregates much more than just social accounts. Aside from Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, MultiMi also includes your emails, photos, Google Calendar and Google Docs, among other services. In addition, its AVG origins bring AVG link scanning to all your social activities, protecting you from dubious links and phishing scams.

In practice, however, MultiMi seems to have bitten a bit more than it can chew. Upon launching it for the first time, MultiMi will prompt you to add your accounts. Here, already, some problems arise; for example, the connection to Facebook chat failed without further explanation, only to suddenly connect without notice several days later. Once your accounts are linked, MultiMi will take a while to synchronize your activities, which can now be browsed through the left sidebar.

MultiMi large message display
MultiMi provides a convenient interface for browsing your activities, with a large window display of the current message, complete with all possible actions.
MultiMi's sidebar is divided into 10 tabs, including a customizable Home tab, Messages, Social, Events, Reader, Photos, and even a built-in browser. Moving between tabs is a slow affair, at least on my 2.2GHz, 4GB machine, and even after all items load once, there's still quite a wait when switching tabs.

Looking at the imported content in MultiMi, I saw that almost nothing made it through in one piece. Google Reader feeds were stripped of their folders, Picasa photos simply never made it, Facebook content took a very long while to appear, and not all unread emails appeared as they should. To top it all off, Google Talk showed only one contact out of dozens, and a spell-check bug marked correctly spelled words and included the mark in an outgoing email.

MultiMi account connection screenshot
Adding accounts to MultiMi is easy. The friendly interface will show you the way.
On the positive side, MultiMi does let you send updates, emails and files from one slick, centralized interface. Adding files is done by a simple drag and drop, and files can be shared on social networks or simply uploaded to Picasa, Google Docs or Box.net. You can also save drafts of your Facebook and Twitter updates to send at a later time, although a post scheduler is still missing.

The killer feature, and the one I will probably come back to MultiMi for, is the ability to search through all your networks for one keyword or phrase. In theory, you can also use the interface to view only photos and media from your feeds, but this worked only partially, pulling photos mainly from Facebook.

The addition of some useful features and improvement of the current ones could turn MultiMi into a decent and secure control center for your online life. All in all, MultiMi feels like a great effort, but one which is not quite baked yet.

To comment on this article and other PCWorld content, visit our Facebook page or our Twitter feed.
At a Glance
  • PCWorld Rating

    MultiMi is an original take on social clients, but it's not necessarily better than the defaults.

    Pros

    • Aggregates all networks and email under one client
    • Integrated antivirus
    • Lets you search all your networks at once

    Cons

    • Slow
    • Some options simply do not work
Notice to our Readers
We're now using social media to take your comments and feedback. Learn more about this here.