How to Sync Your iDevice When the Case Gets in the Way

iTunes Wi-Fi Sync
Reader Jed wrote in with this problem:

My iPhone lives inside one of those extended-battery cases, which is good for power but bad for syncing. I've lost the special sync cable that came with the case, meaning I now have to take the case off (major hassle) whenever I want to sync with iTunes. This is driving me nuts. Is there some other way to sync?

Good news, Jed: there is! With the introduction of iOS 5, Apple made it possible to sync with your PC via Wi-Fi, meaning you don't need a dock, cable, or anything else -- just your existing home network.

This feature came and went without a lot of fanfare, which I find surprising because it's singularly awesome. Well, okay, there's one downside, but it shouldn't affect you: Your iPhone must be plugged into a power source for Wi-Fi syncing to work. (Update: Should have said "automatic Wi-Fi syncing." You can sync manually even without a power source.)

Because your iPhone is pretty much constantly plugged into a power source (i.e. your battery case), syncing should be a snap.

I won't go into great detail on how to set up and use the feature, because PC World's Alex Wawro already did in "How to Use Wireless Sync in iOS 5."

However, I will add that there's one other option to consider, one that's good for anyone who's running into a PC-sync issue (whatever it might be): Skip the PC altogether. Thanks to iCloud, you can now get all your syncing done without involving your PC at all.

Needless to say, you have a couple good options for solving your sync situation. I tend to be fairly old-school, meaning I'm continuing to sync with my PC, but I can sure see the advantages of switching to the cloud -- er, the iCloud.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

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