Android 5.0's new Trusted Places feature kills passcode prompts in your home

android 50 lollipop

Smartphone passcodes are a necessary evil. They help protect your phone from prying eyes, but oh what a pain it is to unlock your phone every time you want to send a text or check Twitter.

To lessen that annoyance, Google recently introduced a new feature for Android 5.0 (Lollipop) devices that will have you typing your secret digits less often.

A recent update to Google Play Services adds a new feature called Trusted Places to Android 5.0's Smart Lock feature, according to reports from Android Police and Droid Life. As its name implies, Trusted Places decides whether or not to throw-up a lock screen based on the device's current location and pre-defined areas you set as trusted.

If you set your home as a trusted place, for example, you won't need to enter your passcode while you're at home.

The impact on you: Trusted Places is an excellent example of just how useful geofencing (where your devices takes a specific action based on location) can be. Google already uses geofencing in a number of its products. The company's new Inbox app, for example, has a feature that can pop an email to the top of your stack when you arrive at home or the office.

Smarter trust

Trusted Places is the latest addition to Lollipop's Smart Lock settings. The feature already includes a trusted device option that lets you bypass the lock screen when you are close to another Bluetooth- or NFC-enabled device such as your work PC or car stereo.

Smart Lock in Lollipop also has a trusted face feature, which is an extension of Android's face unlock feature first introduced in Android 4.0.

If you haven't upgraded your Nexus device yet, Trusted Places is yet another reason to install that OTA or flash your device to start fresh.

This story, "Android 5.0's new Trusted Places feature kills passcode prompts in your home" was originally published by Greenbot.

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