Spotify mails it in on Linux app

The streaming service has been without a Linux developer for more than a year.

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Spotify launched a native Linux client back in 2010, bringing its music streaming service to the Linux desktop. While Spotify has continued releasing new versions of its Linux application, the company hasn’t had a dedicated Linux developer in a year.

No dedicated Linux developer 

In March 2016, Spotify representative “Jooon” revealed that “after September, we have had no developers working on the Linux client.” It’s now September 2016, so Spotify has been without a dedicated Linux developer for a year. “This version is unsupported,” reads Spotify’s description of its own Linux client.

Jooon went on to list a number of known issues with the Linux client, noting that the developers don’t plan on fixing all the bugs they know about. “Most of these we want to fix, but others (like missing tray icon) we probably won’t.”

Spotify is still releasing new versions for Linux, but no one’s really working on it. “Most of the time, a new Linux release will have no Linux-specific changes, only the changes it shares with the Mac and [Windows] clients.” If a feature is added to Mac and Windows and it also works on Linux, it will appear in the Linux build. If something breaks in the Linux build, there’s no guarantee it will be fixed.

Sometimes issues are fixed, however. Spotify just released version 1.0.37, which allows Spotify on Linux to open Spotify URIs again. If a Spotify employee has some free time, they might fix a bug in the Linux build.

Linux users do have Spotify’s web player

It’s not all bad. Spotify now offers a full-featured Spotify Web Player that you can access in a modern browser like Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome, even on Linux. You don’t actually need a desktop app when you can open the service in a browser. In fact, some competing music services—Google Play Music, for example—work only in a browser and offer no desktop apps for streaming music on any platform.

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