Katherine NoyesSenior U.S. Correspondent, IDG News Service

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Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers enterprise software in all its forms, with an emphasis on cloud computing, big data, analytics and artificial intelligence.

European Union

Europe places a billion-euro bet on quantum computing

The European Commission plans to invest a billion euros in quantum computing as part of a larger initiative to strengthen Europe's competitiveness in the digital economy.

certified openstack administrator

Got cloud skills? Now you can get certified by the OpenStack Foundation

The new Certified OpenStack Administrator exam is designed to give cloud professionals a way to prove their worth while also helping employers identify qualified candidates.

Doom ViZDoom

Doom will be AI's next big gaming challenge

AI may have trounced humanity in the ancient game of Go, but it remains untested in countless other gaming arenas.

MIT robot algorithm

MIT uses 4D maps to help robot teams navigate moving obstacles

It's one thing to keep robots from crashing into fixed obstacles like walls or furniture, but preventing collisions with other moving things is a much tougher challenge.

Legal

How do you stop patent trolls? This algorithm just might do the trick

Patent trolls have proven a big enough problem to attract White House attention, but there's been little consensus on how to stop them. A new tool from artist and engineer Alexander Reben aims to bring algorithms into the picture.

ubuntu 16.04 canonical

Meet the new Ubuntu: A Linux release tailor-made for enterprises

Ubuntu Linux 16.04 LTS is now out, and its extended support makes it particularly suitable for businesses. Here's an overview of what you can expect to find.

lawgeex legal machine learning crowdsourcing

No lawyer? This online tool uses AI to review your contracts

Business documents written in foreign languages are no longer the problem they once were thanks to technologies like Google Translate, but what about contracts written in legalese?

rmit quantum

Quantum computing, here we come: A qubit data bus may soon be possible

Transporting information from one place to another is a key part of any computing platform, and now researchers have figured out a way to make it possible in the quantum world.

MIT AI2 cybersecurity AI

AI + humans = kick-ass cybersecurity

Neither humans nor AI has proven overwhelmingly successful at maintaining cybersecurity on their own, so why not see what happens when you combine the two?

hardware security embedded circuit board integrated controller

Schools put on high alert for JBoss ransomware exploit

More than 2,000 machines at schools and other organizations contain a backdoor in unpatched versions of Red Hat's JBoss enterprise application server software and are ready to be infected by ransomware.

mit bug finder ruby on rails

MIT's new bug finder uncovers flaws in Web apps in 64 seconds

Finding bugs in Web applications is an ongoing challenge, but a new tool from MIT exploits some of the idiosyncrasies in the Ruby on Rails programming framework to quickly uncover new ones.

quantum moves game scienceathome

Why AI still needs us: To build quantum computers

We humans may still be licking our wounds following AI's victory at the ancient game of Go, but it turns out we still have something to be proud of.

ultrathin thread IoT antenna

Internet of pants? This ultrathin thread could make your clothes part of the IoT

Your clothes could one day monitor your fitness levels or boost your smartphone reception thanks to a new technique that uses ultrathin electronic thread to embroider circuits into fabric.

spare5 client ui

This big-data startup combines AI with human savvy to help make sense of your data

Spare5 on Wednesday released a new platform that applies a combination of human insight and machine learning to help companies make sense of unstructured data.

your face is big data photography

'Your face is big data:' The title of this photographer's experiment says it all

Got privacy? You may think you do, but a recent experiment by a Russian photographer suggests otherwise.