Peter SayerIDG News Service Paris bureau chief, IDG News Service

Peter Sayer covers open source software, European intellectual property legislation, and general technology breaking news for the IDG News Service.

Till Faida, CEO of Eyeo, the company behind Adblock Plus.

German adblocking case adds new twist to AdBlock Plus whitelist policy

Fed up with readers using ad blockers to access its content for free, German publishing giant Axel Springer won a free ride of its own in a court appeal on Friday.

david cameron resigns brexit

Why the UK's vote to leave the EU will have little effect on its data protection rules

U.K. businesses hoping for more relaxed data protection rules in the wake of the referendum vote will have to wait -- perhaps for a very long while.

priv 0190

BlackBerry slips into the red as revenue drops by a third

It looks as though BlackBerry CEO John Chen will still be in charge long enough to launch another couple of phones -- although don't expect any new flagship models.

security code big data cyberespionage DDoS

Think tanks mull Geneva Convention for cybercrime

A Geneva Convention on cyberwar: That's how a panel of experts proposes to deal with the growing threat to critical infrastructure posed by the possibility of cyberattack.

Intel

Intel's appealing $1.4 billion European antitrust fine over blocking out AMD

Intel is still contesting a €1.06 billion (then $1.4 billion) antitrust fine from the European Commission, which in May 2009 found it had abused its dominant position in the market for x86 processors.

3.artik 10 developer board

This IS your grandma’s Internet: Samsung plans to invest in IoT

In the future, everything will be connected -- even your grandparents. That's what Samsung Electronics is counting on as it draws up a four-year plan to invest US$1.2 billion in US IoT startups and research.

the dao

A blockchain 'smart contract' could cost investors millions

Investors in a "smart contract" built on the Ethereum blockchain platform may have lost cryptocurrency worth millions of dollars because they missed a loophole in the contract's fine print.

'Made in China' dominates Top500 supercomputer list

China's Tianhe-2 supercomputer has just been overtaken as the world's fastest by another Chinese computer, the Sunway TaihuLight, capable of 93 million billion floating-point operations per second.

zora robotics

Belgian hospitals turn to robots to receive patients

Robots have already invaded the operating room in some hospitals, but in Belgium they will soon be taking on the potentially more difficult task -- for robots, at least -- of greeting patients and giving them directions.

drone volt janus 360

The Janus 360 drone shoots hi-def, all-around immersive video

The Janus 360 from Drone Volt can carry ten GoPro Hero4 4K cameras to shoot hi-def video up, down and all around

151027 facebook headquarters 8

'Spam king' Sanford Wallace sentenced to 2.5 years in prison for Facebook phishing scam

Self-styled spam king Sanford Wallace was sentenced to two-and-a-half years in prison on Tuesday for a phishing scam that resulted in the sending of over 27 million messages to Facebook users.

20160222 ericsson hans vestberg mwc

Ericsson will lay off 3,000 this summer, says Swedish newspaper

Ericsson is preparing to lay off between 3,000 and 4,000 staff this summer, according to Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet.

Nokia Smart Home Gateway

Nokia hopes its new IoT platform, Impact, will be a hit

Nokia hopes it will have a hit on its hands with Impact, an all-encompassing new Internet-of-Things management platform that brings together several existing products.

Max Schrems at irish dpc

US government seeks to intervene in Irish data protection case

The U.S. government wants to intervene in an Irish court case that has already disrupted the transatlantic flow of European Union citizens' personal information on which many businesses rely.

facebook messenger attack

Hackers could have changed Facebook Messenger chat logs

Here's a Facebook hack straight from the pages of the novel 1984: A way to rewrite the record of the past.