Don't-Miss Government Stories

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Surveillance reform measure blocked in the wake of Orlando killings

The U.S. House of Representatives voted down an anti-surveillance amendment after some of its members expressed concern about its impact on the fight against terrorism, in the wake of Sunday’s massacre in Orlando.

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They're at it again: Senate panel votes to weaken net neutrality rules

It's the issue that won't die: A Senate committee has voted to weaken the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules.

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Huge FBI facial recognition database falls short on privacy and accuracy, auditor says

The FBI has been slow to assess the privacy risks and hasn't adequately tested the accuracy of a huge facial recognition database used by several law enforcement agencies, a government auditor said.

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U.S. appeals court upholds net neutrality rules, but the fight is far from over

An appeals court has upheld the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's controversial net neutrality rules, passed in 2015.

US Capitol

A popular cloud privacy bill stalls in the Senate

A bill to give email and other documents stored in the cloud new protections from government searches may be dead in the U.S. Senate over a proposed amendment to expand the FBI's surveillance powers.

US agency lines up broad support for ICANN transition

A U.S. agency has lined up broad support for its plan to end the government's oversight of the Internet's domain name system, despite opposition from some Republicans in Congress.

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Transfer by US of Internet oversight could face new hurdles

U.S. plans to transfer the oversight of key technical Internet functions to an international multi-stakeholder model have run into hurdles, with two bills introduced on Wednesday that would require the government to first take the approval of Congress for the transition.

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Emergency responders might share their LTE network with the rest of us

The national LTE network for public safety that’s planned for the U.S. might also boost cellphone performance with a network-sharing system proposed by a startup.

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Google, Facebook, Yahoo, rights groups oppose FBI expansion of surveillance powers

Google, Facebook and Yahoo and industry and civil rights groups have opposed legislation that would extend the categories of Internet records that the U.S. government can collect without court approval through administrative subpoenas known as National Security Letters.

umbrella agreement signing

EU and US officials sign 'umbrella' data protection agreement, but it's no Privacy Shield

The European Commission has signed a landmark agreement with the U.S. in its quest to legitimize the transatlantic flow of European Union citizens' personal information.

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Espionage cited as the US Federal Reserve reports 50-plus breaches from 2011 to 2015

The U.S. Federal Reserve, the nation's central bank, detected more than 50 cybersecurity breaches between 2011 and 2015, including a handful attributed to espionage.

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Iran orders messaging apps to store data of local users in the country

Iran has ordered messaging apps to transfer data and activity records of Iranian users to local servers within one year, a move that will give the country a greater ability to monitor and censor the online activity of its people.

Easy Everyday Encryption

Senate proposal to require encryption workarounds may be dead

A proposal in the U.S. Senate to require smartphone OS developers and other tech vendors to break their own encryption at the request of law enforcement may be dead on arrival.

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Senators want warrant protections for US email stored overseas

A new bill in Congress would require U.S. law enforcement agencies to obtain court-ordered warrants before demanding the emails of the country's residents when they are stored overseas.

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U.S. government agencies are still using Windows 3.1, floppy disks and 1970s computers

Some U.S. government agencies are using IT systems running Windows 3.1, the decades-old COBOL and Fortran programming languages, or computers from the 1970s.