How to set and keep your preferred default font in Word

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn't bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
More by

Streeter S. Stuart (whose name is as unique as mine) doesn’t like Word’s default Calibri font. He’s also tired of changing it every time he starts a new document.

If you’re happy with the default settings, Microsoft Word can be a wondrously powerful and intuitive application. It’s also extremely versatile and can be configured to match your own personal preferences. Unfortunately, many of the configuration tools are anything but intuitive.

That also goes for changing Word’s default font. It’s easy enough to change a font in the word, paragraph, or document you’re working on. But changing the programs’ default font—the one that comes up every time you create a new document—isn’t so obvious.

Read more »

0

When Windows Update won't update

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn't bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
More by

Something is blocking Windows Updates on Robert Douglas' PC.

0310 shut down 140

It happens every month: Windows tells you that you need to shut down the PC for an update. But sometimes, you shut it down, reboot, and you still get the update Shut down notice. The update hasn't updated.

Read more »

4

Use KeePass in both Windows and Android

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn't bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
More by

R. Don Schneider protects his passwords by storing them in KeePass. But he also wants to access them on his Android phone.

Everyone on the Internet should use a password manager, and KeePass Password Safe is one of the best. Like all such programs, it stores your passwords in an encrypted database that's easy to access as long as you remember the master password. But it's also free, easy to use, and open source. (See Some password managers are safer than others for details.)

But you're not always at your computer. You'll inevitably want access to your password database from your smartphone, as well.

Read more »

0

Move from a hard drive to an SSD

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn't bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
More by

David R McCullough needs to clone his 1TB hard drive to a 120GB SSD. It's like moving all your furniture from a big house to a small apartment.

I've discussed the advantages of installing an SSD while also keeping your large hard drive in The Best of Both Worlds: An SSD and a HDD. I've also explained how to Move your libraries to an external drive without messing things up--important with most laptops when you switch to an SSD.

But I confess: I never covered the basic job of moving your Windows installation from a large-capacity hard drive to a faster but more limited SSD. I'll fix that right now.

Read more »

1

Reinstall Windows when you've lost your reinstall disc or partition

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn't bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
More by

Wayne Klawuhn used DBAN to securely wipe his hard drive. Unfortunately, it also wiped the tools necessary for reinstalling Windows.

Every computer sold with Windows pre-installed must come with a tool for reinstalling the operating system. The most common approach puts the restoration tool on a special partition on the hard drive. Some PCs, especially from small manufacturers, come instead with an OEM Windows DVD.

But what do you do if the partition has been lost--either through a hard drive crash or user error? Or what if that DVD has been misplaced?

Read more »

1

Read EPUB books in your browser

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn't bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
More by

Rudi Lehnert asked if there’s a way to open and read .epub books in a browser.

Most of the e-books I read are in the .epub format, primarily because I’m allergic to Digital Rights Management. (An .epub can have DRM, but they usually don’t.) A handful of e-tailers sell unprotected .epub books, although you may have a hard time finding recent bestsellers that way. And almost any book old enough to be in the public domain is available free in that format from Project Gutenberg and similar sites.

[Email your tech questions to answer@pcworld.com.]

Read more »

0

Improve the look of your slideshows

Lincoln Spector Contributing Editor, PCWorld

When he isn't bicycling, prowling used bookstores, or watching movies, PC World Contributing Editor Lincoln Spector writes about technology and cinema.
More by

When he runs a slideshow, Dan Brindell wants more than a quick cut from one photo to another. He wants the photos to “roll and fade” with interesting transitions.

Windows’ native file manager, called File Explorer in Windows 8 and Windows Explorer in previous versions, has a built-in slideshow. Open a folder filled with photos, and you’ll find a Slide show button on the toolbar (Microsoft prefers the two-word spelling—slide show; I don’t). When you select that option, then right-click the resulting full-screen slideshow, you’ll find options to control the order and speed of your show. But you won’t find options for fades, dissolves, wipes, or other transition effects.

For that you’ll have to download additional software.

Read more »

0