Privateer on Your iPhone?

Galaxy on Fire 3D: The Bus Ride Review
One man. One game. One morning commute.

I forget how many space sorties I've flown over the years. Elite, Privateer, Wing Commander, X-Wing vs. Tie-Fighter, Freelancer....but those days are long gone. Then I saw Galaxy on Fire 3D for the iPhone, and all those memories came racing back.

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Rhythm Heaven Review

Rhythm Heaven: The Bus Ride Review
One man. One game. One morning commute.

Nintendo assumes that I have rhythm. Big mistake. I'm a nerdy guy. I have what my Mom calls, "Dancing Issues." I'm just trying to play Rhythm Heaven on the 30-minute ride to work. Good luck.

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Resistance: Retribution Review

Resistance: Retribution: The Bus Ride Review
One man. One game. One morning commute.

A side-story to the Playstation 3 series, Resistance, has come to the PSP. Now, I'm a little scared when I hear that someone's attempting to bring an action-shooting game to a handheld. Here's why: After playing these shooters on PCs and Consoles for years, few games figure out how to make precise controls work while you're on-the-go. Sony actually pulled it off.

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Henry Hatsworth Review

Henry Hatsworth in the Puzzling Adventure: The Bus Ride Review

One man. One game. One morning commute.

How does a mobile/handheld game play on the morning commute? Let's find out.

For those that can't decide whether they want to play Tetris or a Super Mario Brothers title now have a Reese's peanut buttery mash-up of two great game styles. Henry Hatsworth uses the Nintendo DS's two screens to let you play both types of games at the same time. And the sum is better than both parts.

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Galactica Star Finds Geek Love

If you've ever heard the cries of a Gnome Death Knight, you know the work of voice actor, Dino Andrade. If you've ever watched an episode of Battlestar Galactica (the original or the new series), you've seen Richard Hatch. But what do these two guys have in common besides being staples of a dork diet? They're bringing geeks together to find love--and to form a multimedia social network. Seriously.

It sounds like a joke at first, but think about it: Do you go to a bar, wearing your nerdliness on your sleeve? How does that work out for you? SoulGeek.com is the brainchild of Andrade, who came up with the idea in 2006 while standing in line for a Battlestar Galactica event with his then-girlfriend. "A young gal saw us hand-in-hand and said, 'I hope I can find a geek of my own here.' When I heard that, all these horrible memories flooded back." There was the loneliness of being a widower ("The love of my life, Mary Kay Bergman, passed away in 1999, and it tore me up for a long time.") and of searching online for someone equally geeky to share his life with. That's when he got that Field of Dreams-like vision: Build a nerd dating site...and the fanboys will come. Now, SoulGeek is 16,000 strong and growing by 1000 new members a month; they hail from the United States, Mexico, Australia, England, Spain, Canada...and even a couple of stray nerds in Belize.

Richard Hatch as Tom Zarek.
But how does Richard Hatch (aka the "OG" Apollo, aka Tom Zarek) factor into all this? While Andrade helped those who were looking for love, Hatch envisioned a network of Web sites for sci-fi fans--something that would be more than just a way to bring like-minded nerds together. "The networks are scanning YouTube, looking for fresh new ideas, and I wanted to create a home where people can hang out and share their own ideas with others," says Hatch. "Whether it's a graphic novel, Web comic, Webisode, a series to pitch and develop it further--even upload their videos to our site."

Battlestar Galactica's Richard Hatch Talks

On going from being the good guy (Apollo in the original series) to playing an antihero (Tom Zarek):
"There's nothing better than being an actor in a show they love. I've never played a character as much as I loved playing Tom Zarek. As an actor, you're always looking to play enigmatic, challenging, complex roles. Zarek--like many of the characters on this show--isn't black-and-white. We've all gone through some trauma at some point that changes how we see the world. Here we have a political revolutionary idealist that stood up for human rights and suffered for 25 years in prison because of it. I played Zarek as a flawed good guy. He's a damaged idealist with little faith in government and the powers that be.

"BSG was very much about dealing with a post 9/11-type scenario where democracy--a fragile institution--can easily be lost out of fear. I think BSG explored how easily that could happen and how even good people do bad things...but with good intentions."

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