5 ways to use your bounce rate to improve your website

Many website owners focus on the quantity rather than the quality of clicks when they open up their Google Analytics dashboard. But the quality of your clicks is far more important. Luckily, you can determine that easily by your bounce rate—the percentage of visitors who come to your site but leave shortly after arriving.

Visitor numbers and campaign performance are key areas of interest when examining site traffic using Google Analytics, but you should give the bounce rate equal attention. In the video below, Avinash Kaushik, Google's digital marketing evangelist, calls the bounce rate "the sexiest metric ever. It helps you ask the right questions. It will help you quickly distill down where things are not going right."

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A 'want' on Facebook could be just what your business ordered

Brad Chacos Senior Writer, PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Brad Chacos spends the days jamming to Spotify, digging through desktop PCs and covering everything from BYOD tablets to DIY tesla coils.
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Facebook is testing a new feature dubbed "collections" that lets users create wish lists of products by clicking on "want" or "collect" buttons.

Some test pages sport a "collect" button, which lets users save an item to a collection called "products" and allows a user's friends to see the activity in their news feeds—similar to the way users can see which pages their friends “like.” Other test pages display a want or like button to do the same thing, visible within the news feeds of friends of friends. All three buttons add the chosen items to the user's Timeline as part of a new "products" section.

At this point, the features reflect how Pinterest works; the collectable items are mostly photographs found on the Facebook pages of a chosen handful of test brands.

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What's a Facebook 'like' worth?

Brad Chacos Senior Writer, PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Brad Chacos spends the days jamming to Spotify, digging through desktop PCs and covering everything from BYOD tablets to DIY tesla coils.
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What's the tangible, money-in-the-bank benefit of a Facebook follower? Social marketing mavens have pondered the question for years and we're still not any closer to a hard answer. Facebook last month swept fake "Likes" from its pages, to the chagrin of spammers. But do efforts at gaming the social network even pay off? If you're using Facebook for legitimate marketing, what's the ROI of having virtual fans?

Depending on who you ask and the metrics you use, a Facebook follower could be worth nothing at all, as little as $3.60, as much as $22.93, exactly $136.38 more than a non-follower, or a whopping $214.81 for a nonprofit organization.

That's a lot of numbers—and a gaping variation in the value of a "Like." Where does the truth lie?

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Facebook: For ads, clicks aren't all that counts

Brad Chacos Senior Writer, PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Brad Chacos spends the days jamming to Spotify, digging through desktop PCs and covering everything from BYOD tablets to DIY tesla coils.
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Traditional wisdom—and online ad budgets—measure success in clicks. While that may work for ads on Google, Facebook says that focusing on the per-click return isn't the best method for businesses seeking to spread brand awareness. Per-click metrics don't show the "outcomes that happen in the grocery store, in the car dealership, or in the local coffee shop," said Brad Smallwood, Facebook’s director of pricing and measurement, as TechCrunch reported Monday.

Facebook lets advertisers play with test designs.

Instead, the real value lies in overall impressions, according to Smallwood. Reach and impressions have long formed the backbone of TV advertising, but online ads have tended to favor per-click metrics, a concrete way to know how many people saw an ad. Yet, click-throughs typically make up a tiny 5 percent or less of an ad's overall impression numbers. 

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11 ways to mine LinkedIn for hidden talent

Brad Chacos Senior Writer, PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Brad Chacos spends the days jamming to Spotify, digging through desktop PCs and covering everything from BYOD tablets to DIY tesla coils.
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If you listen to conventional wisdom, LinkedIn is a vast sea of potential hires, all just waiting to jump onboard your company. The good news: LinkedIn indeed holds deep recruiting potential. The bad news: Rock star candidates won't start banging on your door just because you've whipped together a basic LinkedIn profile.

As with all recruiting efforts, mining LinkedIn for talent takes time and effort. Here's how your business can tap into the world’s largest professional network and find the right person for the right job.

First, let's start with some basic stuff.

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Do Klout Perks carry any real-world weight?

Brad Chacos Senior Writer, PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Brad Chacos spends the days jamming to Spotify, digging through desktop PCs and covering everything from BYOD tablets to DIY tesla coils.
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You may be more than the sum of your parts, but to Klout, you're just a number. The analytics company monitors your interactions on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and beyond. It then sorts through the data to generate a numeric score that purportedly "measures a person’s overall online influence" on a scale from 1 to 100.

Klout Perks

tweak to Klout's algorithm in August was designed to improve accuracy, pulling in more variables and identifying "real world reach" with factors as Wikipedia mentions.

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Beware of fake 'likes,' and other false social signals

Brad Chacos Senior Writer, PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Brad Chacos spends the days jamming to Spotify, digging through desktop PCs and covering everything from BYOD tablets to DIY tesla coils.
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As social networks continue to grow, businesses are scrambling to grab customer attention and convert it to dollars. Some companies, however, aren't afraid to turn towards sleazier methods to amplify brand awareness. Gartner Research predicted today that 10 to 15 percent of all social media reviews by the end of 2014 will be fake critiques paid for by unscrupulous advertisers.

Gartner suggests that most of the paid-for reviews won't include disclosure about the reviewer's relationship with the reviewee, which could land both parties in legal hot water. In fact, the firm expects at least two Fortune 500 companies to come under fire by the FTC for attempting to game the social system over the next two years.

"Many marketers have turned to paying for positive reviews with cash, coupons and promotions including additional hits on YouTube videos in order to pique site visitors' interests in the hope of increasing sales, customer loyalty and customer advocacy," said Gartner analyst Jenny Sussin, in a press release.

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