Security and quality top companies' reasons for using open source

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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Why should you use open source software? The fact that it’s usually free can be an attractive selling point, but that’s not the reason most companies choose to use it. Instead, security and quality are the most commonly cited reasons, according to new research.

In fact, a full 72 percent of respondents to the eighth annual Future of Open Source Survey said that they use open source because it provides stronger security than proprietary software does. A full 80 percent reported choosing open source because of its quality over proprietary alternatives.

black duck slide 1 2014

Surprisingly, the fact that it's often free is not the main reason most businesses choose open source software.

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Ubuntu 14.04 beta 1 offers a sneak peek at 'Trusty Tahr'

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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Ubuntu 14.04 “Trusty Tahr” isn’t scheduled for final release until April 17, but because it’s a Long-Term Support version, its arrival is the focus of considerable anticipation, particularly among business users.

We won’t get to see its final form for some time, of course, but there’s nothing like a beta version to give us a sneak preview, and that’s just what Canonical released last week. The main Ubuntu Linux didn’t participate in this first beta, but numerous other spins did, including Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu and Ubuntu GNOME.

Though they’re just for testing, they can be downloaded now from the Ubuntu Wiki. Alternatively, read on for the “Cliffs Notes” version summarizing some key highlights.

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What you need to know about the GnuTLS Linux bug

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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A critical Linux bug that many are comparing to the “goto fail” problem that afflicted Apple last month was recently discovered, prompting Linux distribution and application developers to scramble to incorporate a new patch into their code.

The bug, which affects the GnuTLS library for implementing the SSL, TLS and DTLS, security protocols, could cause software to falsely indicate that a particular communications connection is secure, when in fact it is not. As with the Apple flaw, that opens the door to “man-in-the-middle” exploits where an attacker could secretly intercept and manipulate the user’s communication.The problem was discovered during a code audit last month. Red Hat then notified the other affected distributions, and a patch was released Monday.

“Users of Red Hat Enterprise Linux can obtain updated corrected GnuTLS packages in their usual way or see https://access.redhat.com/security/cve/CVE-2014-0092 for links to our advisories,” said Mark Cox, Red Hat’s senior director for product security.

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Device-spanning Ubuntu Touch OS gets October 17 launch date

Brad Chacos Senior Writer, PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Brad Chacos spends the days jamming to Spotify, digging through desktop PCs and covering everything from BYOD tablets to DIY tesla coils.
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The audacious Ubuntu Edge smartphone crowdfunding experience may be dead, but the dream of merging phone and PC lives on. Ubuntu Touch, the form factor-spanning mobile operating system intended to power the Edge, finally has a release date: October 17, alongside Ubuntu Linux 13.10.

The news comes courtesy of a Ubuntu Phone team mailing list message by Canonical technical architect Loïc Minier, as well as a blog post by QA community coordinator Nicholas Skaggs.

“We are exactly one month away from the release of [Ubuntu 13.10] Saucy Salamander,” Skaggs wrote on the 17th. “As part of that release, Ubuntu is committed to delivering an image of Ubuntu-Touch, ready to install on supported devices.”

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Zorin OS 7: This may be the Linux distro you're looking for

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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It's been almost a year since Zorin OS 6 made its debut, and since then several minor updates to the user-friendly Linux distribution have been released as well.

On Thursday, however, the Zorin project team rolled out a release candidate for Zorin OS 7, the next major version of the software.

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Considering a Linux career? Four tips for new college grads

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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'Tis the season for college graduations, and that means there are countless fresh grads out there looking for their first real, professional jobs.

Those in IT would be hard-pressed to come up with a better area to focus on than Linux, which is consistently shown to offer higher salaries and more opportunities than do other parts of IT. There's tremendous demand for Linux skills today, so those who possess them are in a nice position as they enter the job market.

The Linux Foundation
Jim Zemlin
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Skype for Linux 4.2 aims to deliver more polish

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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It's been almost a year since Microsoft moved its newly acquired Skype for Linux out of beta with the release of version 4.0, surprising more than a few Linux fans with its apparent commitment to maintaining a telephony client for the free and open source operating system.

This week, however, that commitment became even harder to dispute given the release of yet another significant update to the software.

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