So Long, Cinnamon: Cinnarch Linux is reborn as Antergos

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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Regular PCWorld readers may recall Cinnarch, a Linux distribution I covered last fall that combined Arch Linux with the relatively new and alternative Cinnamon desktop environment.

Cinnarch was just in beta at the time, but recently the project team behind it announced that they planned to abandon Cinnamon  as a default desktop, calling it “too much a burden to maintain/update going forward.”

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Five new features coming in Firefox 21 tomorrow

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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It's been about six weeks since the release of Firefox 20, so assuming Mozilla stays on its usual schedule, Firefox 21 will make its debut on Tuesday.

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This next version of the popular open source browser has already attracted attention for the changes brought in early versions to Firefox's “Do Not Track” capabilities, but those are by no means the only interesting additions we'll see.

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Korora Linux 18 aims to deliver a friendlier Fedora

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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There's no doubt that desktop Linux has become increasingly user-friendly over the years, but it's equally true that some distributions focus more on ease of use than others do.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are two examples at the forefront of this usability trend, but recently I came across another that has put friendliness at the forefront of its goals.

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Canonical staff to get working Ubuntu phones by late May

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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Canonical on Wednesday announced its next moves on the way to market with a Linux-powered phone.

By the end of this month Canonical plans to equip its employees with early versions of its widely hyped “Ubuntu phone” for testing and refinement.

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Linux code is the 'benchmark of quality,' study concludes

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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Fans of free and open source software (FOSS) may recall a report from Coverity last year that found open source code typically has fewer defects per thousand lines of code than proprietary software code does.

Fast forward to this year, and the news is even more striking.

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Five things to like About Debian 7.0 'Wheezy'

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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After more than two years of development, the Debian project on Saturday released the long-awaited version 7.0 of its venerable Linux distribution.

Code-named “Wheezy,” the new release brings several compelling new features, including an improved installer, multiarch support, tools for deploying private clouds, and a complete set of multimedia codecs and front ends that remove the need for third-party repositories.

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Google and Adobe beautify fonts on Linux, iOS

Katherine Noyes , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers business and tech in all its forms, with an emphasis on Linux and open source software.
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Users of Android, Chrome OS, Linux, and iOS devices may not realize it, but FreeType open source software is used to render fonts on more than a billion such devices. Not only that, but the FreeType project this week got a significant update from none other than Adobe and Google.


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