Microsoft patches critical flaws in Internet Explorer and Exchange Server

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Is it already mid-August, and are we really up to the eighth Patch Tuesday of 2013? It’s time to start planning Halloween costumes and thinking about holiday shopping. Yikes!

For the August Patch Tuesday, Microsoft has released eight new security bulletins. That’s not a light month by any stretch, but considering there have been many months with nearly double that amount, it’s not too bad. More importantly, only three of them are rated as Critical, and none of them are being actively exploited in the wild. Security experts seem to unanimously agree that the top priorities this month are Internet Explorer (MS13-059) and Microsoft Exchange Server (MS13-061).

microsoft internet explorer
Microsoft has released a Critical update
for Internet Explorer.
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Aha! streamlines development with cloud-based project management platform

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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There’s a new tool available for software development projects. Aha! is designed to help define a product roadmap and enable collaboration to keep the project humming along smoothly.

It’s been a long time since I’ve been involved on the project management side of the fence. I always used—and still have—Microsoft Project. The thing with Microsoft Project, though, is that it's a complex and cumbersome tool, and it requires a fair amount of knowledge and experience to use properly.

Aha! is a cloud-based project management platform designed with software development in mind.
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Google Maps ads are a big opportunity for local businesses

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Google is so synonymous with searching the Web that it became its own verb, but that’s not its real business. At the core of Google Search, Gmail, Google Docs, Google+, and other services, Google is primarily an advertising platform. Now, Google is incorporating ads into Google Maps in a way that benefits local businesses.

When a user searches Google Maps, paid content will appear in a purple box, and the icon on the map will be purple instead of red. The user can tap or swipe to get more details, directions, reviews, and other information about the advertised businesses.

Local small businesses should take advantage of Google Maps advertising.
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Expensify expands capabilities to create ‘expense reports that don’t suck’

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Keeping track of hours, mileage, and receipts is tedious. Compiling it all into an expense report that will pass the scrutiny of the accounting department can be a nightmare. Expensify wants to relieve that burden by delivering “expense reports that don’t suck,” and it continues to add new features to achieve that goal.

Expensify streamlines the process of tracking and filing business expenses.

The service has simplified expense reporting for remote and traveling employees by letting them record expenses on the fly, photograph receipts on their smartphone (for receipts under $75, Expensify guarantees that its eReceipts are IRS compliant), and use its GPS to determine travel miles. Expensify can also import transactions from online bank or credit card data and automatically categorize most expenses to save employees the effort.

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Windows Phone App Studio lets businesses craft custom apps

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Microsoft recently unveiled the Windows Phone App Studio, a tool to make it easier to develop apps for Windows Phone smartphones. Microsoft is hoping it will help expand the volume and variety of apps available in the Windows Phone Store, but it’s an especially useful tool for businesses that want to use Windows Phone.

What’s that? You’re not a programmer? Good news, then—no coding skills are required to use the Windows Phone App Studio. It’s a free, Web-based service (currently in beta) that provides a variety of templates and essentially lets you drag and drop design and function elements to create an app without writing a line of code.

Lumia 920
Microsoft is making it easy to develop custom apps for Windows Phone.
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Why storing passwords in Chrome is a bad idea

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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It seems like almost every website you visit has a login of some sort. Managing and remembering them is virtually impossible, so for convenience the major Web browsers offer a feature that saves your passwords. But software developer has discovered that it’s a bad idea to trust this sensitive information to your browser—especially if your business uses Google Chrome.

chrome
The Chrome Web browser stores passwords
in easily accessible plain-text.

Elliot Kember wrote a blog post about the critical flaw in Chrome password security. He had decided to switch from Safari to Chrome and wanted to import his Safari bookmarks so he’d have access to all of the same sites and content between the two browsers. He was alarmed to find that one of the “options” under “Import bookmarks and settings” is to import saved passwords. However, the option is grayed out and automatically checked, meaning it’s mandatory and there’s no choice to not import saved passwords.

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Crossbar's RRAM could disrupt flash memory market

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Flash memory runs the world right now. It's a $60 billion market at the heart of virtually all electronics. Thanks to Crossbar’s resistive RAM technology, though, Flash may soon be a fading memory (pun intended).

Consider how much you and your business depend on flash memory. Smartphones rely on it. Tablets rely on it. So do USB thumb drives. Most ultrabooks use SSD or hybrid drives that combine traditional hard drive technology with flash memory. Without flash memory, your business might come to a grinding halt.

Crossbar’s innovative RRAM technology could disrupt the NAND flash market.
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