Expensify expands capabilities to create ‘expense reports that don’t suck’

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Keeping track of hours, mileage, and receipts is tedious. Compiling it all into an expense report that will pass the scrutiny of the accounting department can be a nightmare. Expensify wants to relieve that burden by delivering “expense reports that don’t suck,” and it continues to add new features to achieve that goal.

Expensify streamlines the process of tracking and filing business expenses.

The service has simplified expense reporting for remote and traveling employees by letting them record expenses on the fly, photograph receipts on their smartphone (for receipts under $75, Expensify guarantees that its eReceipts are IRS compliant), and use its GPS to determine travel miles. Expensify can also import transactions from online bank or credit card data and automatically categorize most expenses to save employees the effort.

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Windows Phone App Studio lets businesses craft custom apps

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Microsoft recently unveiled the Windows Phone App Studio, a tool to make it easier to develop apps for Windows Phone smartphones. Microsoft is hoping it will help expand the volume and variety of apps available in the Windows Phone Store, but it’s an especially useful tool for businesses that want to use Windows Phone.

What’s that? You’re not a programmer? Good news, then—no coding skills are required to use the Windows Phone App Studio. It’s a free, Web-based service (currently in beta) that provides a variety of templates and essentially lets you drag and drop design and function elements to create an app without writing a line of code.

Lumia 920
Microsoft is making it easy to develop custom apps for Windows Phone.
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Why storing passwords in Chrome is a bad idea

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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It seems like almost every website you visit has a login of some sort. Managing and remembering them is virtually impossible, so for convenience the major Web browsers offer a feature that saves your passwords. But software developer has discovered that it’s a bad idea to trust this sensitive information to your browser—especially if your business uses Google Chrome.

chrome
The Chrome Web browser stores passwords
in easily accessible plain-text.

Elliot Kember wrote a blog post about the critical flaw in Chrome password security. He had decided to switch from Safari to Chrome and wanted to import his Safari bookmarks so he’d have access to all of the same sites and content between the two browsers. He was alarmed to find that one of the “options” under “Import bookmarks and settings” is to import saved passwords. However, the option is grayed out and automatically checked, meaning it’s mandatory and there’s no choice to not import saved passwords.

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Crossbar's RRAM could disrupt flash memory market

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Flash memory runs the world right now. It's a $60 billion market at the heart of virtually all electronics. Thanks to Crossbar’s resistive RAM technology, though, Flash may soon be a fading memory (pun intended).

Consider how much you and your business depend on flash memory. Smartphones rely on it. Tablets rely on it. So do USB thumb drives. Most ultrabooks use SSD or hybrid drives that combine traditional hard drive technology with flash memory. Without flash memory, your business might come to a grinding halt.

Crossbar’s innovative RRAM technology could disrupt the NAND flash market.
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Microsoft continues to miss the point with Surface pricing

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Microsoft got out the axe again, and cut the price of some Surface Pro models by $100. While the move may help boost the anemic sales of Microsoft’s tablets, it’s not significant enough to make a real impact—especially for business users.

It’s being framed as a sort of “back-to-school” promotion, following closely on the heels of a dramatic drop in the price of Surface RT tablets. Saving money is great, and $100 is $100, but the cost of Surface Pro models is still high compared with some competing devices, and the reduced price is unlikely to sway a purchasing decision.

The Surface Pro is a great tablet—but $100 off won’t really make a difference.
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Qualys launches tool simplifying protection for Web applications

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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You may not always be able to tell while you’re surfing it, but the Web is under almost constant siege. Companies have to find effective ways to secure and protect websites and Web-based applications. At the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas Wednesday, Qualys announced a new tool to make it easier for small and medium businesses to manage Web security.

Qualys’ Web Application Firewall (WAF) is delivered as a component of the QualysGuard Cloud Platform, which provides a simple, centrally-managed tool for administering security for both on-premise and cloud-based servers. The WAF beta is available as an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) to be used with Amazon EC2 cloud services, and as a VMWare virtual image for use with on-premise virtual servers.

Qualys WAF gives SMBs a simple, affordable tool for protecting websites.
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Dell's Project Ophelia could be more bad news for PCs

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Dell is shipping Project Ophelia devices to early beta testers. PC sales are already suffering at the hands of mobile devices, and now Dell’s Android PC-on-a-stick threatens the relevance of traditional PCs from a different angle.

First, a little about Project Ophelia. The device is about the size of a large USB thumb drive. Instead of just flash-based storage, though, Project Ophelia packs a Rockchip RK3066 processor and 1GB of RAM, as well as both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity into that small space. It also has a microSD card slot to add additional storage if necessary.

It runs on Google’s Android mobile OS. The device demonstrated at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona earlier this year ran Android 4.1 (a.k.a. “Jelly Bean”), but it seems reasonable to assume Dell will ship the device with the current version of Android before its official launch, which is expected to be the end of this year.

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