Pentagon clearance for iOS could open even more doors for Apple in the private sector

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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The Pentagon's decision to grant Apple the security clearance required for iOS 6 devices to go head-to-head with BlackBerry 10 and certain Samsung Galaxy S4 devices on secure military networks could have with a cascading effect that spills over into the private sector.

BlackBerry 10 and the Samsung Galaxy S4 received security clearance from the Pentagon earlier this month. The Pentagon has not approved Android in general, or even the Samsung Galaxy S4 in its default state. The Samsung Galaxy S4 is authorized only as long as it uses Samsung’s Knox security software.

The Pentagon has cleared iOS 6 devices for use on secure military networks.
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Microsoft takes care of IE zero day with Patch Tuesday update

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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It’s Patch Tuesday again, and Microsoft has plenty to keep IT admins and users busy this month. Microsoft has released ten new security bulletins for May, but the two that should get the most attention and the highest priority are both related to the Internet Explorer Web browser.

Microsoft patched a total of 33 vulnerabilities this month. There are eight patches ranked as Important, which affect a range of technologies and products including Microsoft Word, Publisher, Visio, and Lync as well as the .NET framework and the Windows kernel. The remaining two patches are both rated Critical, and both address vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer.

microsoft internet explorerMarc Maiffret, CTO of BeyondTrust, explains that MS13-037 affects all supported versions of Internet Explorer—and therefore impacts all supported versions of Windows as well. He points out that three of the vulnerabilities addressed are present in all versions of Internet Explorer, and attackers will likely focus on these to target the broadest possible pool of vulnerable systems with the least amount of effort.
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Microsoft takes the offensive against Google, and it's about time

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Google was once a humble startup with a big dream—to be the David that takes down Microsoft’s Goliath. Google has become a tech force to be reckoned with, challenging Microsoft in almost every area including Web search, browsers, email, operating systems, productivity software and mobile platforms. Over time, it has chipped away at Microsoft’s market share.

Microsoft is great at many things, but over the years marketing has not been one of its strengths. Microsoft has also been a victim of hubris, ignoring threats to its products because it believes its dominance is untouchable. Lately, though, Microsoft has been campaigning more aggressively against Google to protect its market share.

Microsoft is on the offensive to defend Office against Google Docs.
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Why changing your LivingSocial password won’t save you

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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LivingSocial revealed last week that it was the victim of a cyber attack that compromised the account details of its 50 million customers. To address the situation, LivingSocial sent a notice to customers, and reset users’ passwords to force people to create new ones.

Don’t make the mistake of believing that changing your password is your only concern.

According to LivingSocial, the unauthorized access of its customer data servers yielded the names, email addresses, birth dates, and encrypted passwords of 50 million customers, but the company stresses that customer credit card details were not compromised because that information is stored on a separate server that the attackers did not access.

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Younity 1.5 could render cloud storage obsolete

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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As we’ve become a more mobile society—working from virtually anywhere on our smartphones and tablets—we’ve also embraced various cloud storage and file sharing tools, so we can access and collaborate on our data. Younity has an entirely different approach, and it could make cloud storage obsolete.

Is that sensational hyperbole? In a word: no. But, it really depends on your data, how you use it, and who you need to share it with.

I use a variety of cloud storage services. I rely primarily on Box, but I also have accounts with Dropbox, Microsoft SkyDrive, Google Drive, Amazon Cloud Drive, and others.

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Take steps to secure what little online privacy you still have

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Before you can take steps to protect your privacy, you need to define just what the word means. And the second task can be more difficult given the spread of social-networking tools and Big Brother legislation such as CISPA.

Microsoft's recently launched privacy-awareness campaign includes a survey ostensibly designed to help consumers determine their "privacy type," based on how they use the Internet and how they perceive privacy concerns. The campaign is a subtle attack on its primary rival, Google, but it also enables Microsoft to ascertain the public's thoughts on privacy and how people go about protecting theirs.

While the very concept of privacy is rapidly evolving, you can protect yours with a combination of discretion and knowing how to use available privacy-protection tools.

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Smaller Windows 8 tablets will be huge

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Microsoft has confirmed that smaller Windows 8 tablets will come to market in the near future. These will fill a gap in the Windows ecosystem and boost demand for Windows 8 by addressing key downsides to the early Surface tablets.

Windows tablet sales seemed to start off impressively, but the overall results so far are mediocre at best. Microsoft isn't sharing the numbers, but recent reports suggest that 1.5 million Surface tablets have sold, with 400,000 of them Surface Pro. The Surface Pro sold out almost instantly, but without actual sales data, it’s hard to know whether that’s impressive.

Surface Pro was hot when it launched, but overall sales are disappointing.
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