OneDrive or Drive for Work: Choosing the best cloud storage option

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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If you want to store your photos, music, videos, or other personal data online, there is certainly no shortage of available cloud storage choices to pick from. As Microsoft and Google battle for cloud storage supremacy, the customers win, but you have to do a little homework to determine which service is the right one for you.

Microsoft recently raised the bar again for its OneDrive cloud storage. It bumped the free OneDrive capacity from 7GB to 15GB, and announced that all Office 365 consumer accounts will receive 1TB of OneDrive storage, just as it announced in April for Office 365 business accounts. The move basically catches Microsoft up with where Google already was. Google provides 15GB of free Google Drive storage, and users can buy up to 1TB of storage for $10 per month.

onedrive logo

Microsoft is providing 1TB of OneDrive storage for all Office 365 accounts. 

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Study: 7 in 10 concerned about security of Internet-of-Things

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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The Internet-of-Things is a thing. If you haven’t heard about it yet, get ready because we’re in the early stages of an explosion of technology that will connect, monitor, and in some cases share almost every aspect of our lives. Fortinet conducted a survey of consumers to find out what people think about the security and privacy concerns of the Internet-of-Things.

The survey, titled “Internet of Things: Connected Home,” was produced in partnership with GMI, a division of Lightspeed Research. More than 1,800 consumers between the ages of 20 and 50 who claim to be tech savvy participated in the survey, which was administered in 11 countries around the world, including the United States, Australia, China, Germany, India, and the United Kingdom.

The majority of those surveyed believe that a connected home—a home in which household appliances and home electronics are seamlessly connected to the Internet—is “extremely likely” to be a reality in the next five years. The actual number was 61 percent in the United States, and an overwhelming 84 percent in China.

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Box brings Box Notes to its iOS apps

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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About a month ago Box launched Box Notes—a note-taking tool built right into the Box site. Now, Box is extending support for Box Notes to iPhone and iPad users.

The underlying concept of Box Notes is not unique. Popular tools like Evernote and OneNote accomplish the same goal. But what sets Box Notes apart for businesses that rely on Box for file storage and sharing, is the fact that it's tied in to the same security controls, file sharing permissions, and data encryption as the rest of the data they store and manage in Box.

iphone newnote

Box Notes is now available in updated iPhone and iPad apps from Box. 

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Study: Concern over mobile device theft on the rise

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Have you ever had a smartphone or tablet stolen? The devices' size and portability makes them prime targets for criminals, and there is a rising trend of people being mugged for their mobile devices. A new study found that consumers are increasingly concerned with the risk of having a mobile device stolen.

In the study conducted by Inhance Technology, a provider of mobile device insurance and protection programs, 27 percent of U.S. consumers reported being more fearful of being mugged for their smartphone or tablet. The results were slightly lower—only 21 percent—for consumers in the United Kingdom.

Smartphones and tablets aren’t cheap, so it makes sense to be worried about having a mobile device get lost or stolen. One aspect of the study that stands out, though, is the fact that 77 percent of female respondents, and 72 percent of male respondents actually consider the personal content on the mobile device more valuable than the device itself.

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Study: The traditional office will soon be extinct

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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It’s not news that mobility is one of the major driving forces in IT today. Smartphones and tablets continue to supplant traditional PCs as primary computing devices, as people are getting more done from wherever they happen to be. A new study from Aruba Networks found that the demand for mobile productivity also puts significant stress on IT personnel and budgets.

Aruba Networks conducted a survey of 1,000 IT professionals from around the world. The goal of the study was to learn more about how IT professionals are managing younger employees, dubbed "GenMobile" in the study. Aruba Networks also commissioned The Future Laboratory to conduct a separate, but related, study to examine what the workplace will look like in the near future. Combined, the studies are a good illustration of existing trends and challenges facing IT and a compass to help organizations plan for the rapid changes on the horizon.

One point that seems clear in both studies is that wireless connectivity is a business requirement. Businesses recognize that ubiquitous access to wireless connectivity leads to higher employee retention, more productivity, and greater cost savings. Aruba Networks also discovered, however, that there is a long way to go to achieve the goal of an all-wireless workplace for most businesses.

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Defend yourself against World Cup scams

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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The 2014 World Cup tournament kicks off today in Brazil. Soccer (or football anywhere outside of the United States) is the most popular sport in the world, and billions of people will be following the matches closely. While you’re busy figuring out how to stream games to your work PC while appearing to be busy with an Excel spreadsheet, you should be aware that World Cup will also be a feeding frenzy of malware and phishing attacks.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise. Capitalizing on major news and current events is a common technique for cyber criminals. Millions of people sitting on the edge of their seats, waiting for any tidbits of information related to the World Cup tournament, are simply too big and too easy of a target to pass up.

Guillaume Lovet, senior manager of the FortiGuard Labs’ Threat Response Team, shared his thoughts with me about the top four scams you should be on the lookout for as the World Cup gets underway.

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Vigilance is the only cure for comment spam

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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One of the best ways to demonstrate expertise and establish a positive reputation for your business or your employer is by sharing information through posts on a website. And one of the best ways to engage customers is to allow comments on those posts and to respond to them. If you’re not careful, though, spammers will derail your comments and possibly drive potential customers away.

new report from Imperva reveals that 80 percent of the comment spam originates from less than one-third of the spammers, and a mere 17 percent of comment spammers actually account for a majority of the comment spam traffic. Imperva also found that nearly 60 percent of comment spammers are active for long periods of time.

Wikipedia defines comment spam as "a broad category of spam bot postings, which abuse Web-based forms to post unsolicited advertisements as comments on forums, blogs, wikis and online guest books.”

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