Study finds most mobile apps put your security and privacy at risk

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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The average smartphone user has 26 apps installed. If recent research conducted by HP is any indication, approximately, well, all of them, come with privacy or security concerns of some sort.

The HP study focused purely on custom business apps, but there's no reason to believe the issue doesn't extend to commercial apps you find in the Apple App Store or Google Play. Many apps have access to data or permission to perform functions they shouldn’t.

Almost every app HP tested contained some sort of privacy issue.
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Why mobile and cloud will converge to become Mobile Cloud

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Everything’s coming up mobile these days. Gartner estimates that PC sales will make up only about 13 percent of device sales in 2013—and some undisclosed portion of those PCs are notebooks. The more we rely on small, mobile devices to get things done, the more we also depend on cloud storage and services to extend functionality beyond what the mobile device itself is capable of. That’s why mobile and cloud will become mobile cloud.

The IEEE Computer Society lists mobile cloud as one of its Top Technology Trends for 2014. IEEE explains, “Mobile devices are constrained by their memory, processing power, and battery life. But combined with cloud computing, data processing and storage can happen outside of mobile devices.”

Storage is a major constraint for most mobile devices. Smartphones typically have only 8GB or 16GB of local storage, while tablets tend to have 32GB or more but still max out at 128GB. Ultrabooks, and many notebook PCs, have abandoned traditional hard drives in favor of solid state drives (SSD), which are typically only 128GB or 256GB. There are larger SSDs, but they’re prohibitively expensive for most purposes.

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Do your homework before buying a new smartphone this Black Friday

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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The clock is ticking down to Black Friday, the official kickoff of the holiday shopping season. Granted, the definition of “Friday” has been blurred as retailers continue to leapfrog each other to be first to offer unbeatable holiday deals, but sometime this week you should be able to find some excellent deals on a new smartphone if you’re in the market.

Some people go into a smartphone purchase knowing what they want. They know up front that they want the new iPhone, or the latest Samsung Galaxy S model. However, most people aren’t that dedicated to one platform and are open to buying whichever device meets their needs and seems like the best deal. For those people, the survey data from FixYa will come in handy as a shopping guide.

smartphones
Fixya's survey identifies the leading user complaints about popular smartphones.
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OneNote Windows Store app adds Share charm integration, camera scanning

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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OneNote is one of the best applications Microsoft has developed in recent years. With yesterday's update of the OneNote Windows Store app, it just got better, with the ability to capture notes using the Share charm and scan physical documents with your device's camera.

The Windows 8 OneNote app from the Windows Store just got even better.

 

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How to find everything in Windows 8.1

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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It’s inevitable that upgrading to a new version of an operating system or application comes with a bit of a learning curve. With Windows 8.1, though—and its predecessor Windows 8—the curve is steep, and just finding simple tools and features can be a challenge.

Windows 8 isn’t just a new version of Windows, it’s a completely different OS in many ways, with its own unique features and conventions that may confound even the most ardent Windows users. Under the hood, most of the familiar Windows tools are still there, but they’re buried in strange places where they can’t be easily located, especially not when Microsoft took away the coveted Start button.

Sifting through the apps in Windows 8.1 can be a tedious process.
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Purple WiFi lets businesses trade free wireless for valuable customer data

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Thanks to McDonald’s and Starbucks, free wireless networking is available every 200 yards or so, at least in metropolitan areas of the United States. Still, many merchants—especially smaller “mom & pop” establishments—don’t provide the service. Purple WiFi has a business model that can help these businesses offer free Wi-Fi, and seems like a win-win for both the business and the customers.

Customers basically expect free Wi-Fi, so businesses should give it to them.

Purple Wifi offers software that works with a business' existing broadband connection to provide free Wi-Fi network access for customers. Because users are required to sign-in using a social account, the business gets access to valuable social demographic data, such as the age and gender of customers that use Purple WiFi, when users connect, how long they stay connected, and more.

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Gogo's fee-based Wi-Fi misses a big opportunity

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Long flights are an ideal time to get some work done. You have hours to kill, few interruptions, and little else to do aside from taking a nap or reading a book. Thanks to in-flight Wi-Fi services like those offered by Gogo, you can even stay connected as if you were on the ground. But it will cost you.

Gogo allows you to connect your devices to the onboard wireless network, which communicates with Gogo’s towers on the ground, which route the connection to the Internet and let you surf the Web while traveling hundreds of miles per hour at cruising altitude. Now, Gogo is also adding the ability to use text messaging and place voice calls from a flight.

In-flight Wi-Fi is a great service, but Gogo
charges too much to make it practical.
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