Verizon challenge reignites net neutrality debate

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Net neutrality was all the rage a couple years ago as the FCC battled against Internet providers like AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon to implement guidelines governing how Internet service is delivered. It hasn’t been making headlines for a while, but it’s back with a vengeance as Verizon gets its day in court to challenge the net neutrality framework. What's really at stake, though, is the scope of the FCC's authority over the Internet, and Verizon's desire to control and profit from the content that crosses its network.

The FCC developed the Open Internet Framework to establish some guidelines for Internet providers. Supporters of the Open Internet Framework see it as essential to a healthy, open Internet that doesn’t deliver varying access to information depending on which provider you use or how much money you pay. For Verizon, and other opponents of net neutrality, it represents an unnecessary regulatory burden that creates uncertainty and stifles investment and innovation.

Verizon is fighting against net neutrality rules developed by the FCC.
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WiGig is great, but it won't replace your Wi-Fi network

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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You might think at first glance that WiGig is better than Wi-Fi, and that given the choice between the two you’d obviously want the one with the word “gig” in the name. It sounds faster, because it is. However, WiGig has limitations that restrict it to more niche uses than traditional Wi-Fi.

The Wi-Fi Alliance created a separate, unique logo for WiGig to avoid confusion between the standards.

WiGig is the new brand established by the Wi-Fi alliance for the 802.11ad standard. It operates in the unlicensed 60GHz frequency range and promises data transmission rates up to 7Gbps. Real-world throughput will likely be slower, but theoretically—using different modulation and beam-forming techniques—WiGig could yield speeds of up to 25Gbps. That gives a whole new meaning to the term “blazing fast.”

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Will Nokia help Microsoft regain relevance with businesses?

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Microsoft rocked the tech world today with the announcement that it is spending about $7 billion to acquire Nokia. The move has a variety of potential benefits and ramifications, and many of those could have an impact on how your business relates to Microsoft in the years to come.

For many small and medium businesses, the chaos that seems to surround Microsoft may seem like cause for concern. Businesses don’t like change and uncertainty, but the tech landscape has shifted and Microsoft needs to adapt or die. Whichever direction Microsoft goes, it will mean change for the businesses that rely on Microsoft products and services.

Purchasing Nokia puts Microsoft in direct control of its own mobile future.
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Should your next PC be a Surface Pro?

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Microsoft revealed that it’s limited-time $100 discount on Surface Pro pricing isn’t so limited after all. The discount is now permanent, and Microsoft cut the cost of the Touch keyboard cover as well. The reduced pricing makes the Surface Pro more attractive, but it’s still not enough to significantly sway sales.

The Surface Pro is a solid, well-engineered device. On the surface (no pun intended) it’s a tablet, but inside it’s a full Windows 8 PC. It has an Intel Core i5 processor, and 4GB of RAM. Unlike many tablets—especially the very popular Apple iPad—the Surface Pro has a full-sized USB port, an SD memory card slot, and an HD AV port that can be used to connect via HDMI or DisplayPort to an external monitor with the right adapter.

The Surface Pro can compete as an ultrabook, but it's not a great value.
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Hack of New York Times holds a lesson for all businesses

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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The New York Times, Twitter, and other major sites were knocked offline yesterday in an attack by the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA). While there is certainly a political motivation to the hacks, there is an underlying lesson that all businesses should learn.

Apparently, the latest attack was the result of sites being redirected at the DNS server level. AlienVault Labs has posted a comprehensive list of domains pointing to the Syrian Electronic Army server as of last night. The WhoIs data for the New York Times domain showed the SEA listed as the admin for the domain, and the name server entries were modified to redirect to the SEA.

The Syrian Electronic Army took down the New York Times and other high-profile sites.
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Definition of ‘broadband’ is too broad

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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There’s good news, and not-so-good news. The good news is the number of people accessing the network over broadband continues to increase. The not-so-good news is that the term “broadband” is so broad that it’s difficult to tell how good the good news really is.

The Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project conducted a survey of adults in the United States to determine what percentage have made the transition from archaic dial-up Internet access to more modern broadband connections. The results are that broadband access has climbed to 70 percent, while dial-up remains steady at three percent.

Pew survey shows broadband use has climbed to a new high of 70 percent.
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Will iWork for iCloud work for you?

Tony Bradley , PCWorld Follow me on Google+

Tony is principal analyst with the Bradley Strategy Group, providing analysis and insight on tech trends. He is a prolific writer on a range of technology topics, has authored a number of books, and is a frequent speaker at industry events.
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Apple has made iWork for iCloud available to the masses. It’s technically still in beta, but now anyone can use the cloud-based versions of Pages, Numbers, or Keynote from an iCloud account. The question is whether or not iWork is the right suite of tools for you to use.

Apple trumpeted iWork for iCloud at its WWDC event a few months ago. The tools provide Web-based equivalents to Apple’s iWork apps, and join Mail, Contacts, Calendar, Notes, Reminders, and Find My iPhone on Apple’s iCloud.

Pages, Numbers, and Keynote join the iCloud ranks.
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