Google Apps Marketplace Brings Cloud Services Together

The new Google Apps Marketplace extends the search giant's underpowered applications suite, offering a collection of other vendors' Software-as-a-Service applications that work with Google's cloud. The new online store also gives Google a new, if small for now, revenue stream that isn't driven by search-related advertising.

Google Apps, which recently crossed 25 million registered users and 2 million registered businesses, provides e-mail, calendaring, chat, word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and other applications over the Internet. It is available in multiple free and paid versions, all of which can work with applications acquired from Google's new store, the company said.

The Apps Marketplace opened Tuesday night with 50 companies participating, most offering Software-as-a-Service that integrates with Google's cloud-based applications. Most participants are names most customers won't immediately recognize, though Intuit has created a payroll system and Box.net offers a content management system, both sold through the online store.

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New Cisco Router Supports 322Tbps, Designed for Internet Video

What can you do with 322 terabits per second? Cisco Systems says it's enough bandwidth to allow every person in China to make a video call--simultaneously. And if that's something you want to do, Cisco says it now has hardware capable of the task.

The company's newest large-scale core router, the CRS-3, is capable of handling such a speed, which Cisco said is 12-times as fast as its closest competitor and three times the speed of its predecessor. It has invested $1.6 billion in the product's design and engineering.

The CRS-3, announced today, is the product that Cisco last month said would "forever change the Internet and its impact on consumers, businesses and governments."

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New Browser Won't Save Amazon's Kindle e-Reader

It will take more than an "innovative Web browser" to save Amazon's Kindle e-reader from the onslaught of competitors, including tablets from Apple, HP, and seemingly every company in China that owns a soldering iron.

We're talking about this today because of the appearance of a job posting on Amazon's Web site. It says Amazon's Lab126 is looking for help building an "innovative Web browser," widely presumed to be for its Kindle e-reader since the browser is described as "embedded."

New Browser Won't Save Amazon's Kindle e-Reader
Repeating: An innovative Web browser will not stop what is going to happen to Kindle. The device will not be able to compete with next-generation, color-screen tablets that feature e-reader functionality and do more.

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HP Touts Flash as Killer App Against Apple's iPad

HP Touts Flash as Killer App Against Apple's iPad
What will HP's Slate Tablet have that Apple's iPad won't? It's Adobe Flash, a key Internet technology that HP is touting as the key difference between the two platforms. And, HP is right, though how Flash support will translate into sales remains to be seen.

While Apple has its App Store to provide applications for iPad users and iTunes for content, Flash gives HP users access to Web content and apps that iPad users can only dream of. Adobe's AIR provides a framework for developing applications for the HP Slate tablet and other devices that iPad also will not support.

HP has posted two new videos that use Flash and AIR support to take aim at the iPad ahead of its April 3 release.

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New W3C CEO Is the Web's Top Diplomat

In becoming CEO of the World Wide Web Consortium, Dr. Jeff Jaffe brings a resume filled with jobs that required building partnerships and finding consensus. Such business and personal skills will be critical for success in Jaffe's new job heading a standards body.

After all, the W3C still has Sir Tim Berners-Lee, who conceived the World Wide Web, as its technology guiding light. Jaffe, until recently Novell CTO, brings big company management and negotiating experience.

"My most immediate priority is to preserve and enhance the W3C culture of having an open consensus-based process," Jaffe said in a blog post, marking his first day at W3C on Monday. "This works well today, but I also need an effective and open high-bandwidth communications path with the large, diverse, and global set of stakeholders of the W3C."

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Verizon LTE: A Wireless Broadband FAQ

Verizon Wireless says 4G network testing in Boston and Seattle has gone not just well, but surprisingly so, offering wireless data at speeds that top most wired broadband connections. With such promises, 4G is becoming the wireless buzzword of 2010, as Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint start to battle for 4G leadership. Here's what you need to know, starting with Verizon's LTE network.

What is LTE?

LTE stands for "Long Term Evolution," a name that sounds even stranger as LTE appears to be almost on the horizon for many users. The term "Long Term Evolution" refers to an ongoing process of improving wireless technology, not the endpoint of making that first generation of LTE available to customers. Already, work is underway on an even more advanced techology called LTE-Advanced.

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DocVerse Purchase a Stopgap for Google Apps

With its purchase of DocVerse, Google has stepped up competition with Microsoft Office. Yet, the acquisition also acknowledges weaknesses in Google Apps and how far Google is from being a serious Office challenger.

DocVerse describes itself as a "painless" tool for real-time sharing and collaboration using Microsoft Office files. It was not designed to work with Google Docs files. It seems likely the first integration with Google Apps will be simply making the DocVerse product available pretty much "as-is." That would mean as an Office add-on that stores files in Google's cloud.

By purchasing DocVerse, Google has acknowledged the obvious: Microsoft Office is the dominant force in productivity applications and is likely to remain so for a long time. DocVerse gives Google something to offer Office users that might convince them to use Google Apps as well. But, the bigger problem is compatibility issues, both in features and file formats, that DocVerse doesn't solve. Indeed, lacking those issues, Google would likely not need DocVerse.

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