The easy way to manage high-res video and photos

I can’t help but marvel at all the ways it’s possible to shoot high-definition videos: with a digital single-lens reflex cameras, pocket cam, helmet cam, phone cam, and the list goes on. I love that I can shoot as much footage as the camera’s memory card will allow without having to worry about tape wearing out or paying for film development.

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Creating cool music videos out of photographs

What if you wanted to make a music video, but all you had were snapshots of the band? I faced this very situation recently, when I decided it would be cool to make a music video of my old band, a ’70s prog-rock powerhouse called Halogen. I had live recordings, but unfortunately I didn’t have any videos. However, I did have a box full of old photos. And I had CyberLink PowerDirector 9’s slideshow tool.

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Sharing is easy to do

Having whipped up a short video of my kitchen remodel using CyberLink PowerDirector 9, it was time to show it to friends and family. To do that, I needed to convert — "transcode" in geek speak — the video from the format it was shot and edited in to a format that would play on the devices my peeps were likely to want to watch it on: iPhones, Androids, iPads, and online.

One of the great things about PowerDirector is that it lets you get things done without having to speak the jargon. On the other hand, if you feel like basking in techno-babble, it lets you do that, too. Here’s what I mean.

To convert a video in PowerDirector, all you have to know is a) what your audience is going to be watching your videos on, and b) whether you want to send out low, medium, or high-quality video. (Right now you might be wondering: Why not always make a high-quality video? Because, ironically, the better the quality the bulkier the video and the more likely people are to experience delays or problems watching it, especially on cell phones. Medium quality or lower is perfectly fine for quickly sharing non-professional clips.)

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Turning video on its side

Anyone who has taken a picture knows there are two basic ways to frame a shot: horizontally (a.k.a. landscape) or vertically (portrait). The thing is, when you shoot video vertically — which is easy to do by accident when using a video-capable camera, phone, tablet PC, or other gadget — it plays sideways on your monitor. You have to tilt your head to watch. Not good!

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