Don't-Miss Stories

Jan Uddenfeldt

The Internet of things needs a lot of work

Mobile connected devices may make life easier for consumers in the long run, but today they present a bundle of user headaches.

Motorola faces challenges in going global with the Moto G

The Moto G smartphone expected from Motorola on Wednesday will likely be available outside the U.S., but competing in the increasingly tough mid-range segment globally won't be easy.

Acer's CEO is just the latest victim of the PC industry's struggles

Yet another CEO of a major PC player has been shown the door. The times appear dark, but the future of computing has never been brighter.

Microsoft's Surface 2 tablet follows faithfully in the footsteps of failure

Yes, the Surface 2 is a truly impressive hardware specimen. But as always, it's what's inside that counts.

"Wintel" alliance suffers as Intel cozies up to Chromebooks

New Chromebooks announced this week signal Intel's willingness to broaden its horizons and work with companies like Google, at the expense of its long-standing Windows partnership with Microsoft.

Smartwatches won't click with consumers until they grow Google Now–style brains

The tech world's gone gaga for the smartwatch concept, but the real world won't bite until the tech does more than push notifications to your wrist.

on techhive.com

Sayonara, Steve: How a new Microsoft CEO can breathe new life into Windows

A new Microsoft CEO can reshape the company in ways Steve simply can't at this stage of his career, and that could be a boon for besmirched desktop lovers.

Why Lenovo's surging mobile sales shouldn't freak out the PC faithful

The world's top PC maker sells more mobile devices than traditional computers—but traditional computers have been completely redefined.

Analytics company, Brinqa, puts a price on risk

An analytics company is trying a novel approach to evaluating risk: by putting a price on it.

Windows device sales aren't meeting Microsoft's expectations, Ballmer admits

In a closed door Microsoft meeting, CEO Steve Ballmer reportedly admits to disappointing Windows hardware sales. But while the company's smart to rejigger its retail efforts, Windows devices won't shine until the software is up to par.