Don't-Miss Stories

Bring on the 20Gbps speeds: Asus announces world's first Thunderbolt 2 motherboard

You think USB 3.0's 5Gbps transfer speeds are fast? Thunderbolt 2 is FOUR TIMES FASTER.

internet data

China to bring gigabit Internet speeds to key cities by 2020

China plans to bring gigabit Internet speeds to its major cities by 2020, part of its effort to expand broadband among households in the nation.

Ambient communications (1)

Researchers send data without battery, transmitter

Engineers at the University of Washington developed a pair of devices that can successfully exchange data at speeds of up to 10kbps over a distance of up to 1 meter.

on techhive.com

Bad connections dog Google's Mountain View Wi-Fi network

Large parts of a public Wi-Fi network built by Google in Mountain View, California, don't work properly and, according to local residents, haven't worked for months.

Finalized USB 3.1 spec doubles the speed of USB 3.0 to 10Gbps

Your file transfers are going to get a whole lot faster when USB 3.1 hardware hits the streets next year. But what about Thunderbolt?

D-Link DNR-322L

Vulnerabilities in D-Link network video recorders enable remote spying, researcher says

Some D-Link devices that enable remote access to surveillance camera feeds or other potentially sensitive data contain critical vulnerabilities that enable hackers to bypass authentication and access them from the Internet.

EU researchers get 2T bps capacity thanks to network upgrade

The superfast pan-European research network is now available to Europe's educational institutions, research facilities, and hospitals.

Essential networking tips for small business

Stay connected and productive with dual-band routers, personal cloud storage, and more.

Who will benefit from the new EU telecoms regulation?

Removing mobile phone roaming charges in the European Union may prove more expensive for customers in the long run, a telecoms expert has warned.

John Chambers Cisco

Facebook's Open Compute network is limited, Cisco says

Facebook's Open Compute project, which is working on open source servers and switches, will be limited by "weaknesses" in scope that Cisco can exploit, CEO John Chambers said this week.