Don't-Miss Stories

LG_TV

LG smart TVs send data about users' files and viewing habits to the company

You don't just watch an LG TV, LG TVs are watching you.

Human rights groups urge UN to discourage mass digital surveillance

Five human rights groups urged the United Nations (UN) General Assembly to adopt a new resolution against indiscriminate mass surveillance.

Shmidt

'Encrypt everything:' Google's answer to government surveillance is catching on

And the Giants of the Web seems to agree in the wake of recent NSA spying revelations. Lock it all down!

Microsoft Store now selling snarky anti-Google 'Scroogled' mugs and T-shirts

"Keep calm while we steal your data!" the gear cries, below a Chrome logo. Keep it classy, Microsoft.

privacy

Swedish police, service providers on collision course over direct access to user data

Saving the data is mandatory for service providers, but automating the process to hand over data is voluntary. Large service providers aren't on board with the proposal.

U.S. Supreme Court declines to review NSA phone spying case

The U.S. Supreme Court has denied the Electronic Privacy Information Center's petition for it to review a National Security Agency (NSA) phone record data collection program.

In the wake of NSA spying, Yahoo promises encryption everywhere

By March, Yahoo users will have the option to encrypt all data flow to and from the Web company's services.

Skype, Microsoft cleared in Luxembourg NSA investigation

Luxembourg's data protection authority cleared Microsoft and its subsidiary Skype of data protection violations related to the U.S. National Security Agency's Prism spying program, the agency said Monday.

ICANN 'coalition' created to tackle concerns about the future of the Internet

ICANN has set up a panel, consisting of people in government, civil society, the private sector, the technical community and international organizations, to address concerns about the governance of the Internet.

British spies monitor hotel bookings of diplomats around the world

The U.K.'s intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) has reportedly built an automated system to track the hotel bookings of foreign diplomats when travelling abroad for international summits or work meetings.