Don't-Miss Stories

Lawmakers fail to ask NSA chief about agency's malware plans

Instead, a House subcommittee deferred questions about 'damage' of leaks to a classified briefing.

NSA's plans reportedly involve infecting millions of computers with surveillance malware

Leaked documents show the agency was planning to expand its infrastructure for active attacks since at least 2009.

snowden sxsw

Surveillance, Snowden dominated discussions at a more serious South by Southwest

This year’s festival reflected a shift from sharing to security as the dominant trend in technology today.

on techhive.com

browsers-chrome

Three practical reasons to use your browser's private mode

It's not just for dirty pictures. Incognito mode can also help you access your favorite news sites and keep upcoming surprises away from prying eyes.

Cybersecurity

In potential conflict with FISA court, California court wants NSA phone records kept

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court last week disallowed retention of phone records beyond five years

snowden sxsw

Edward Snowden at SXSW: The NSA is setting fire to the future of the Internet

"It's the makers, thinks, and the development community" that can help protect your data from a surveillance dragnet, the NSA whistleblower said via video at a South by Southwest panel

cameron merkel

At Cebit opening ceremony, leaders evoke need to protect private data

All, that is, except U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron, who says violin music and a robot thespian are typical Sunday evening entertainment.

Cybersecurity

Secret court denies NSA request to store phone records beyond 5 years

The government had said the data may be required as evidence for privacy civil suits filed by various groups

assange sxsw

Assange at SXSW: 'Who really wears the pants in the administration?'

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange questions Obama’s power over the NSA during Day 2 of the SXSW Festival in Austin.

legal gavel

Massachusetts alters law to make all upskirt shots illegal

Two days of public outcry was enough to convince Massacusetts legislators that they had better address a legal loophole that allowed a smartphone-toting creep to escape penalties.

on techhive.com