Never Ask for Directions Again

Today's Best Tech Deals

Picked by PCWorld's Editors

Top Deals On Great Products

Picked by Techconnect's Editors

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Page 9
Page 9 of 16

Garmin's Solid StreetPilot

Garmin's StreetPilot c330 (left) nails the basics; Lowrance's iWay 350c packs a surfeit of features.
Garmin's StreetPilot c330 (left) nails the basics; Lowrance's iWay 350c packs a surfeit of features.
The $460 Garmin StreetPilot c330 excels at the basics. Its 3.5-inch color touch screen is big enough for quick and easy reading, but the unit isn't so large that it takes over your dashboard; I wouldn't think twice about stowing it in a suitcase or overnight bag for use during a cross-country trip. Its built-in maps cover the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico, and (like the maps of other units) they are said by the vendor to include several million points of interest.

On startup, the screen confronts you with two big buttons: 'Where to?' drops you into a screen that has six categories, such as Address, Food, Fuel, and Lodging; 'View Map' shows your present location on a digital map, with good accuracy. All of the buttons, including the alphanumeric keys, are of a nice size for quick and accurate touch-screen data entry.

The graphics looked great, and turn-by-turn directions were clear and precise. The product gives you multiple language and voice options; I favored the female voice with the alluring British accent.

The Garmin's screen could be brighter, but a reflective coating makes it readable in bright sun. Address searches proceeded relatively swiftly, but some points-of-interest searches were painfully slow.

Bottom line: The c330 is a great choice for delivering affordable, no-frills navigation.

At a Glance
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Page 9
Page 9 of 16
  
Shop Tech Products at Amazon