MMS: Something AT&T Didn't Screw-Up

As popular as it is to pick on AT&T, it easy is to forget the company occasionally does something right. The addition of multimedia messaging is an example.

OK, so AT&T really should have had MMS available when the iPhone 3GS shipped this summer. We are also still waiting for tethering to be available legally from AT&T.

However, after reports AT&T was concerned that turning on MMS would result in a usage surge and network crash, I was happy to be able to place voice calls throughout the Friday rollout.

I was even happier that MMS, which I started using as soon as it was available Friday afternoon, seems to work just fine. Yes, I was part of the MMS surge and somehow lived to tell.

Not everyone is as happy as I am. You can read news stories that quote some unhappy customer comments from AT&T's Facebook page. I am sure there are problems, but they appear to be relatively few.

Considering how low AT&T set expectations, essentially "Be glad if the network still functions when we're through," I do not want to give them too much credit. Customers have a right to expect feature rollouts that do not paralyze the network.

Still, when a company is as widely disliked by its customers as AT&T, it is only fair to report the other side, too. As an AT&T customer, now happily using MMS, I am more pleased with the carrier today than I was before the rollout. This is to say I am closing in on changing my negative impression of AT&T wireless to a neutral one.

Now, I need to make sure I change my messaging plan from 200 messages-a-month to "family unlimited" if I want to avoid big charges for going over the limit. Sending MMS messages can be addicting--and expensive, if you're not prepared.

David Coursey tweets as techinciter .

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