Windows 7 Security: What You Need to Know, Part Three

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If no AppLocker rules for a specific rule collection exist, all files that share the same format are permitted to run. However, once a rule for a specific collection is created, only the files explicitly allowed in the rule can execute. For example, if you create an executable rule that allows .EXE files in %SystemDrive%\FilePath to run, only executable files located in that path are allowed to run.

AppLocker supports three types of rule conditions for each rule collection: Path Rules, File Hash Rules, and Publisher Rules. Any rule condition can be used to allow or deny execution, and it can be defined for a particular user or group. Path and File hash rules are self-explanatory; both accept wild card symbols. The Publisher rules are fairly flexible and allow several fields of any digitally signed file to be matched with specific values or wild cards. By using a convenient slider bar in the AppLocker GUI, you can quickly replace the specific values with wild cards. Each new rule conveniently allows one or more exceptions to be made. By default, Publisher rules will treat updated versions of files the same as the originals, or you can enforce an exact match.

Worth the Cost
However, if you need to make a rule for a file type that is not defined in AppLocker's policy table, you'll need to use some creativity to get the desired effect. For example, to prevent Perl script files with the .PL extension from executing, you would have to create an executable rule that blocked the Perl.exe script interpreter instead. This would block or allow all Perl scripts and require some resourcefulness to gain finer-grained control. This is not a unique issue, as many other application control products have the same sort of limitation.

AppLocker's configuration and rules can easily be imported and exported as readable XML files, the rules can be quickly cleared in an emergency, and all can be managed using Windows PowerShell. Reporting and alerting are limited to what can be pulled from the normal event logs. But even with AppLocker's limitations, the price tag -- free, if you are running Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 -- can be a strong lure for up-to-date Microsoft shops in preventing socially engineered Trojans.

Next week, I'll wrap up this series with a discussion of many other Windows 7 security deltas.

This story, "Windows 7 Security: What You Need to Know, Part Three" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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