Updated

Best gaming mouse: Find your perfect match

If you're still using the free mouse that came with your PC, it's time for an upgrade.

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Sensor: Dots per inch, or dpi, is a measure of how many pixels the mouse moves on-screen per each inch of desk you move it across. Some people prefer to make large, sweeping motions with a lot of precision, necessitating a low dpi. Others want fast, jerky motions that start and stop on a dime—high dpi. The latter group will want to pay particular attention to each mouse’s limit.

At this point, the dpi arms race has become largely meaningless. Manufacturers push numbers that are so high as to be impractical for most people’s day-to-day use. Is that 16,000-dpi mouse actually more useful to you than the 12,000-dpi mouse? Probably not.

Shape: There are three main categories here, too: right-handed, left-handed, and ambidextrous.

We’ve looked at right-handed and ambidextrous mice because our testers here are right-handed. Some right-handed mice (such as the DeathAdder) have left-handed variants, but these are a rarity. Most southpaws will probably end up with an ambidextrous mouse, like the G-Skill Ripjaw MX780 or the Razer Diamondback.

Best gaming mouse: All of our reviews

Let’s get to it. We’ll keep updating this story with new products, too, so let us know if we’ve missed a personal favorite—we’ll try to get it in for testing.

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